Posted in Articles, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, First Aid Service, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Street Dogs of India

Do you know about JAAGRUTI’s role in spreading awareness and in treatment of maggot wounds

We at JAAGRUTI have perhaps become experts at treating Maggot wound infested Street Animals and teaching others to do likewise :)

Read on…

As part of Jaagruti’s On-Site First Aid Service for Street Animals, from 1st April 2015 till 31st October 2015, we have successfully treated 73 Street Dogs and a Stray Cat for maggot infested wounds, off which all but 5 we couldn’t help heal uptil recovery, as three of them we couldn’t find after few days of treatment and two others died due to old age and Parvovirus infection respectively.

The remaining 69 have all healed, with just a couple of them still being checked on by us daily as their wounds were grave or discovered towards end October 2015); and we have detailed treatment sheets and photos to authenticate our statement and we are extremely proud of our little team’s big efforts!

Most importantly, as part of the way we offer and administer the “Jaagruti On-site First Aid Service for Street Dogs/Animals”, we  also educate and inform caretakers (if any) of these street animals to do daily dressings and administer oral medication to help heal the animal, after we have done the difficult bit for the initial treatment period. As most of the street dogs we attend to have caretakers belonging to the low-income group BUT big-hearted category, we even give them follow-up medication which they need to administer.

We work and treat ON-SITE, in the animal’s natural environment, in a place they know as their home. We don’t believe in doing “rescues” and sending animals off to shelters for treatments.

Healing is faster and the Animal is comfortable and the Caretaker is educated to treat Maggot wounds this way.

We are happy because we are the “changemakers” that we had set out to be.

Because these caretakers, once empowered through the information at their disposal have also gone onto successfully treat other street animals for maggot wound infestations.

And, our Informative Article titled, “Treating Dogs with Maggot Infestations” penned down by us on the basis of our experiential learnings on our very popular Jaagruti blog (www.jaagruti.org) has now clocked 53,134 hits!

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Add to that the many people whom we have guided through WhatsApp, e-mail and Facebook/Phone/blog based consultation to treat their street  animals of maggot infestations and we feel super! Even people as far as US and Australia write to us on this subject.

This Diwali, if you want to appreciate our efforts, consider contributing towards our On-site First Aid Service by clicking on https://jaagruti.org/contribute-to-jaagruti, as 99.5% of what we do is self-funded because a 2-member team can’t do it all, from posting funding appeals to treating so many animals On-Site. We choose to do the latter instead.

Please pitch in towards #Diwaligiftforanimals

Thank you :)

Posted in Against Animal Cruelty, Animal Laws of India, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Games people play, Information that empowers!, Pets, Stories from Ground Zero, Take Action!

Gurgaon Municipal Corporation’s Directive to Presidents of Residential Welfare Societies to stop harassing people who have pets and tend to street dogs

Below are embedded image files/scans of a 3 page letter issued by Commissioner of Municipal Corporation of Gurgaon to Presidents of all RWAs in Gurgaon to stop harassing people who tend to street dogs and those who have pets (by passing unlawful dictats of banning pet dogs). Please use it to contest against your respective RWA’s who come out with weird aristocratic bye-laws on the same.

You can download all these pages combined together as  PDF File by clicking on the link below.

Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-stray-dogs_2012 (https://jaagrutiindia.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/gurgaon-municipal-corporation-directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-stray-dogs_2012.pdf)

Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-stray-dogs_2012_Page 1
Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-street-dogs_2012_Page 1
Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-stray-dogs_2012_Page 2
Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-street-dogs_2012_Page 2
Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-stray-dogs_2012_Page 3
Gurgaon-Municipal-Corporation-Directive-regarding-pet-dogs-and-street-dogs_2012_Page 3

Suggested reading:

For all yours reference again, please click the link below to the Notice issued by a battery of lawyers to a Gurgaon based RWA that came out with an absurd ruling to ban people from having pets.

Legal notice issued to Kanchanjunga Coop.Group Housing Society at Gurgaon 

Also, please refer to this page on the website of Pet Parents Association.

Posted in Animal Birth Control (ABC) Programme/Street Dog Sterilization, Animals, Be the Change, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Events, Pets, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

28th September 2013, World Rabies Day: Get the street dogs you care for vaccinated against rabies

Hi,

We wanted to share that on the occasion of World Rabies Day on 28th September 2013, we at JAAGRUTI can facilitate to get street dogs in your respective areas/locality* in Delhi vaccinated against Rabies for free.

*The only pre-requisite is that you should send us an e-mail or a scanned letter taking a guarantee** of getting atleast 10 street dogs vaccinated to contact@jaagruti.org (stating ‘Free ARV’ in the subject line).

** When we say guarantee, then that means that you should be able to confidently locate and hold the street dog and pet them till the time the paravet injects the vaccine into the dog, without any hoohaa or drama about it!

 

Also, please note that ARV shots cannot be given to pups under 90 days of age.

Also mention the following in this request e-mail you write to us:

1. Your name:

2. Your Address:

3. Number of Street dogs you would like Anti-Rabies Vaccinations (ARV) done for and their area:

4. Your contact number and e-mail ID

If you love your street dogs enough to bring them all the way to the camp ON YOUR OWN to get them vaccinated by doctors on site, then the main FREE ANTI RABIES VACCINATION camp is being organised on 28th September 2013, Saturday at:

Address: Baba Khimman Singh Park, Opposite KD Block, Ashok Vihar-Phase 1, Delhi (Near Big Transformer)

Timings of the Camp: 8AM to 3PM

You can even get your Pet Dogs, whose ARV shots are due or you have forgotten (as unfortunately most callous ignorant lazy pet owners may do..) to this camp.

Posted in Animals, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Information that empowers!, Medical treatment of Animals, Pets, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

Treating Dogs with Maggot infestations

On-site First Aid Treatment for Prevention and Cure of Maggot wounds in Street Animals:

It is the onset of warm weather and humid conditions that trigger an onset of maggot wound related queries on our helpline and the below treatment protocol has been shared aplenty by us through our website www.jaagruti.org, e-mail queries and blog based queries.

A horrifying number of street animals die tragic and slow painful deaths owing to maggot infestations. But, maggot wounds can be prevented and treated on site very easily (if noticed before it is too late) and these unfortunate deaths can be prevented if animal welfare volunteers read through this article below and back the knowledge so acquired with animal handling skills and some amount of patience, determination and dedication; all of which are essential qualities that are required to help heal a voiceless animal.

What are Maggots and how do they infest an animal? : 

Flies get attracted to garbage, carcasses, rotting food, open wounds and faeces and use them as substrate to lay their eggs. A particular type of fly, called screwworm flies has a special fondness to lay its eggs on fresh, untreated open wounds on any animal’s body and that is what can trigger maggot infestation. These wounds could be there on an animal’s body due to a fight they might have gotten into, itching, licking, accidental injuries etc. A wound of the size of a pinhole may be enough for a fly to get attracted and lay eggs on. In areas the animal can reach with his tongue, these fly eggs are usually licked off. Danger areas for an animal where maggot infestations are common are the ears, anywhere on the head and neck, back of the body, anus.

These eggs, once laid on the wound site of an animal can hatch within a few hours into larvae or “maggots”, which start out very small just like a thin rice grain but then start feeding into the flesh and organs of any animal (be it a calf, a cat, a tiger or a dog) and then they (maggots) grow fat and up to an inch long. Alongside, they penetrate into the animal’s body and the wound increases in surface area and deepens in no time, resulting in more flies getting attracted to that side and laying even more eggs, thereby infesting it even further with maggots.

Left untreated, maggot wounds are fatal as the animal may die due to the maggots tunnelling into their brain or vital organs (depending on the site of the wound), blood loss or secondary infections.

Where and how will you see maggots or understand that the animal is infested with maggots and requires treatment?

You won’t see maggots crawling like ticks or lice on the skin surface or hair, instead what you will see is a ‘hole’ in the body of the animal and maggots crawling their way on the wound surface or inside it eating away the flesh and the most potent indicator that an animal has a maggot wound would be that you will smell rotting flesh. This stinking smell will only get worse as the maggots multiply and penetrate through the body of the unfortunate animal.

How to prevent Maggot infestation? 

Prevention is surely better than cure, when it comes to Maggot wounds. Please try to understand that maggot wounds can be fatal/life threatening if not treated on time. Also, note that maggot infestations occur when any small wound on an animal’s body is left untreated and in most cases, that is where it all starts from and especially so in warm, hot and humid weather!

So, if you notice that your neighbourhood street dog/cat/cow/donkey has an open wound, follow the steps below to prevent that wound from becoming infested with maggots:

  1. Clean the wound site with cotton dipped in weak Tincture Iodine solution (this is stronger and works better for wound cleaning in animals). If you cannot procure weak Tincture Iodine solution, please purchase Povidone-Iodine solution (available from your neighbourhood chemist shops under brand names, Betadine, Cipladine or Wokadine etc.). This is followed by outing Nebasulf or Neosporin powder on the wound site. These powders help dry the wound and can be purchased off the local chemist shop as well.
  2. Then to prevent flies from sitting and laying eggs on this wound site, paste a layer of Himax, an ayurvedic veterinary fly/insect repellent, broad spectrum skin ointment (Manufactured by Ayurvet Ltd.) – on top of the wound. Himax ointment has a strong smell and pungent taste, which prevents the animals from licking it. As part of the On-site Street Animal First Aid service that we at JAAGRUTI™ run, we have also applied liberally on the wound site, a layer of another veterinary ointment, Lorexane (Manufactured by Virbac India) to promote wound healing and tissue regeneration and then topping that layer up with Himax ointment. When we choose to mix both ointments and apply them together, then the proportion of Lorexane ointment: Himax ointment was 5:1.
  3. For those of you who think that restraining an animal to clean their wound and apply ointments as directed in Steps 1 and 2 is difficult to execute, then you must consider investing in topical veterinary sprays like D-Mag spray (Manufactured by Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd.) or Topicure spray (Manufactured by Natural Remedies Pvt. Ltd.), both of which help kill maggots as well as promote wound healing. Alternatively, if sprays are not available, you can invest in veterinary powders with wound healing and maggoticidal properties like Gotbac powder (Manufactured by Scientific Remedies Pvt. Ltd.) or Negasunt powder (Manufactured by Bayer) that can be directly applied on an animal/dog’s open wound.
  4. Please note:
    1. Keep repeating the above steps till the open/bleeding wounds on the animal’s body heal. It is important that we don’t take it easy on this as leaving even the tiniest bit of untreated wound would be an opening for the maggots to creep in and cause ‘destruction’!
    2. All veterinary (i.e. animal-specific) sprays, ointments and powders listed in Steps 2 and 3 above can be purchased only through a pet supplies shop or veterinarian’s clinic only and not at your neighbourhood chemist shop.
    3. Steps 1 to 3 listed above under this section are preventive in intent and will help heal an animal’s open wound and prevent flies from turning it into a horrible maggot wound.

How to treat a maggot infested wound?

Once you spot a wound-hole on the body and smell of rotting flesh in an animal, be rest assured that the smell is of maggots chewing away on the animal’s flesh. Any time wasted hereafter will only increase the maggot wound/infestation in size and prolong the animal’s suffering and pain, please ACT FAST and follow the steps below:

  1. KILLING THE MAGGOTS: The first objective should be to kill the maggots and to do that, we use the following options after restraining/muzzling the animal:
    1. Pour a capful or two of medicinal turpentine oil over the wound site. If the wound is deep seated and the only thing you see is a hole outside, then take this turpentine oil into an empty plastic syringe (without the needle) and then push the Turpentine oil into the ‘hole’. Then just let it act over the next 6-8 hours, as the medicine takes effect, you will either see the maggots popping out of the wound on the floor or large chunks of glued insects/dissolved and held together like blobs of pus coming out of the wound.
    2. However, if you can’t find Medicinal Turpentine oil at the chemist’s shop…then please remember – DO NOT PUT Painter’s Turpentine oil/kerosene oil/petrol/phenyl etc.into the maggot wound. We have noticed that, ignorant of the above fact, a lot of people residing in slums or villages and even otherwise in cities do put all of these into a maggot wound which they should NOT DO; because the sheer toxicity of phenyl, petrol and kerosene can prove fatal and burn the good tissues of the animals, especially in sensitive areas like the head, ear (these chemicals can reach the brain through these organs). So our suggestion is that in case you don’t find Medicinal Turpentine oil, invest in maggoticidal (i.e. maggot killing) veterinary sprays like D-Mag spray or Topicure spray and then place it as close to the maggot wound site and then spray it in hard 4-5 times or even more as required. Doing so will have the same effect as those described above post-application of Turpentine oil. This part of the treatment (Steps 1 a. and 1 b.) will cause pain to the animal, but for their own welfare it is necessary that you use it. Please remember, the burning sensation will pass, but if unattended, the maggots will kill the animal.
  2. REMOVING DEAD MAGGOTS: Check the wound to see if the maggots show signs of life. Even when you think you have removed all the maggots, inspect the inside of the wound thoroughly with a torch. Maggots often create tiny tunnels leading from the main wound deeper into the body of the dog. You may not see the maggots in these tunnels. One giveaway is that the bloody fluid in the hole/holes will appear to be moving, literally “breathing,” if you watch carefully for a few minutes. A common error is not waiting long enough to observe this movement. As a precaution, even when you think you have removed all the maggots, spray the inside of the wound with the D-Mag or Topicure sprays. The pungent Turpentine/eucalyptus oil smell will irritate the maggots and they will start emerging from the tunnel. Once you think they are dead and if you are brave and determined, take a sterile tweezers/forceps to remove/pluck out the dead maggots from the wound. Do remember to clean the tweezers/blunt forceps with antiseptic solutions like Spirit /Savlon/Dettol solution prior to use.
  3. CLEANING THE WOUND: Keep clean cotton wool handy and dip it in weak Tincture Iodine solution or Povidone Iodine solution to disinfect the wound site.
  4. WOUND DRESSING:
    1. Put Negasunt or Gotbac powder into and over the wound.
    2. Next step is to liberally apply Lorexane ointment and layer the wound surface or fill up the hole/wound with this. As stated earlier, in this article, Lorexane cream helps heal the damaged wound site by promoting tissue regeneration, while also keeping the flies away.
    3. The most important step at the end is to apply Himax ointment liberally over the wound site to prevent any more flies from sitting on the wound and re-infesting it further with maggots.
  5. Slowly in a few days, fresh skin will start appearing and the open and wide maggot infested wound will heal and you will be glad that your little effort and investment helped save a life for sure…as maggot infestations don’t go away or cure or heal on their own, human intervention in the ways described above are absolutely essential!
  6. Remember to keep repeating the above steps till the wound heals, with a periodicity of 12-24 hours at the start of the treatment and then every other day till the wound heals and seals itself. Treating maggot wounds requires loads of patience, they don’t heal overnight, so please keep up the good work till the animal has healed completely.

We believe following the above steps does help and over July 2014 to November 2014, as part of the On-site First Aid Service for Street Animals that we at JAAGRUTI™ run in North West Delhi, we have followed the steps detailed in this article to treat on-site (i.e. on the very streets these animals live) 24 animals with maggot infested wounds. This included 2 donkeys and 22 dogs and depending on the severity of wounds, it has taken us 2 weeks to 4 weeks to treat all animals. We have been able to do this only because people from the community, where this maggot infested animal was being treated came forward to handle the animal while our team, was administering treatment; and also ensured that the wounded animal was being fed well to help speed up their recovery. From our end, after doing topical treatment to clean and dress the maggot wound, we were also using assistance from trained veterinary professionals to inject the required dosage of antibiotics, Inj. Ivermectin and multivitamins to kill deep seated maggots, minimise infections and promote wound healing. Please consult your local veterinarian and use tablets and syrups mixed in feed to substitute for injectables.

Do let us know if the above works for you too.

Please refer to this Slideshow on Treatment of Maggot Wounds in Dogs

By Vasudha Mehta, Co-founder & Trustee, JAAGRUTI™: 

 

Posted in Animals, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Information that empowers!, Inspiration, Medical treatment of Animals, Stories from Ground Zero, Take Action!

The Dog Care Field Manual by Harrell Graham (Kind Courtesy: Mr. Merrit Clifton at ANIMAL PEOPLE)

We at ‘Jaagruti’ think that this manual serves as a handy asset for all of us who look after our neighborhood street dogs in India and often find ourselves stuck! 

Download The Dog Care Field Manual by Harrell Graham by clicking here 

All text below by Mr. Merrit Clifton from ANIMAL PEOPLE:

This Dog Care Field Manual, by Harrell Graham,  covers wound treatment;  treatment of both internal parasites such as worms and external parasites such as mange;  emergency response to poisoning;  and avoidance of rabies.  Each topic is reviewed in depth and detail,  recommending crisis care that almost anyone can give when the nearest veterinarian is many miles and hours away. 

Graham,   who recently returned to the U.S. after five years in rural Thailand, compiled The Dog Care Field Manual from his own rescue experience,  in consultation with sympathetic veterinarians from around the world.  Asks Graham, “Have you ever seen a sick or mangy dog and found yourself saying, ‘I wish there was something I could do to help that poor creature?’  Are you an expatriate living in a second or third world country where these sick and wounded animals are everywhere?

“This manual will show you how you can spend some time outside helping man’s best friend and at the same time get to know your community, meet people, and make your life more interesting and meaningful.  It doesn’t require a lot:  a handful of readily available medicines, plus some dry dog food.

“The satisfaction that comes from watching a mite-infected, sick and possibly hairless dog gain his strength and beauty back over a period of just a few weeks is hard to beat.”

Much of Graham’s advice will help rescuers anywhere.  Even where veterinarians are plentiful and accessible during business hours, there is not always a clinic open all night when one finds a dog in distress, and even if such a clinic exists, emergency treatment may be necessary before the dog is moved.

“I read it and found it to be very useful,” C.P. Ramaswamy Institute president Nanditha Krishna e-mailed from Chennai, India, less than 24 hours after ANIMAL PEOPLE posted The Dog Care Field Manual for downloading from our web site.  “Since I run a mini shelter with 15 dogs at home, I constantly need help.  I have downloaded the manual to my desktop.”

The Dog Care Field Manual is not meant to substitute for veterinary care, even in remote regions of the developing world.

“I am a big believer in working with a local vet,” Graham told ANIMAL PEOPLE.  In particular,  an experienced local vet “can better diagnose certain cases,”  Graham explained,  where the dog suffers from a condition known in the community,  but not common elsewhere. However, Graham found that the nearest capable veterinary diagnostician was often far distant.  In Thailand, Graham recalls,  “My vet asked me to bring him pictures––rather than haul all the dogs from the temples 30 miles away––and he could tell me what to do if I didn’t already know.  There were only a handful of times I had to do this because, usually,  Ivermectin and some worm pills,  plus maybe some antibiotics,  are all that most dogs need.

“On those occasions where the dog had problems I couldn’t deal with,”  Graham added,  “I took the dog to the vet.”  Examples included “a broken leg with bloody sharp bones protruding;  liver disease with great ascites (belly distention);   and red cauliflower-like transmissible venereal tumors growing on the genitals,  where the dog needed intervenous chemotherapy.  I did administer intervenous vincristine at night once, on the side of the road, with a head lamp,  and no one to assist me,  but a vet can do it much more easily and quickly.”

Graham acknowledges that some of his advice may be controversial.  “Regarding my suggestion of ‘throwing’ multiple drugs such as antibiotics,  antifungals,  and antiparasitics at an animal who has no hair and is sick,”  Graham recalls grilling experts by e-mail,  reminding them that “stray dogs will not have access to multiple tests in a vet’s office.”  Most conceded that “Under those circumstances the ‘shotgun approach’ was okay.”

But Graham prefers to take a more cautious approach.  For example,   “I prefer to not give antifungals,” Graham says,  “until I’ve first dewormed the dog,  and have given the dog Ivermectin for mites,  and antibiotics.”

Adds Graham,  “I’ve treated more dogs with more severe skin infections than most western vets will see in a lifetime of treating ‘yuppy’ dogs.  I know the approach I outline in the Dog Care Field Manual works because it has been ‘battle tested.’  That doesn’t mean it can’t be improved.”

Graham is continuing to research possible additions and amendments. 

Posted in Against Animal Cruelty, Animal Birth Control (ABC) Programme/Street Dog Sterilization, Animal Laws of India, Animals, Articles, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Games people play, General/Animals, Pets, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

Pet Dogs and Street Dogs: Do’s and Dont’s

Below is an article written by Mrs. Maneka Gandhi, who is the Chairperson of an organisation called, ‘People for Animals’. We happened to receive a copy of it in our Inbox from a fellow animal rescuer and deem it wise to share it on this blog of ours, since a lot of our helpline calls and e-mails are related to this subject.

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In recent times, RWAs, Apartment Owners’ Associations, and Cooperative Group Housing Societies, having taking to imposing various restrictions on pet owning residents, such as disallowing the use of lifts, or parks, by pets, or even banning pets altogether. There is widespread resentment against these moves, because not only do they unreasonably restrict the rights of residents, they are also unlawful and against recent court rulings.

Moreover, as an RWA, or an Apartment Owners’ Association, Cooperative Group Housing Society, gated complex, etc., you may often be getting complaints regarding street dogs, and requests that they be driven away, through beatings by security guards or otherwise, or just dumped elsewhere. If you accede to these requests, you will not only be violating laws and pronouncements of courts, but will not achieve any permanent solutions either. The problem will remain a perennial problem ; and you will also run afoul of animal welfare people that are increasing in number by the day, and banding themselves into well organized groups.

Below, are some DOs and DON’Ts, with respect to both, PET DOGS & STREET DOGS.

I.          WITH RESPECT TO PET DOGS & PET OWNING RESIDENTS :Please keep in mind that the following is what you CANNOT do :-

 BANNING pets, whether allowed :

a)     Even by obtaining consensus, or even if the majority of the residents want it, you cannot legally introduce any sort of ‘ban’ on the keeping of pet dogs by residents.

b)     Even by amending bye-laws or regulations or otherwise, such a ‘ban’ cannot be put into place since it is illegal, and does not have the sanction of law. In fact, in trying to ‘ban’ pets, or limit their number, you interfere with a fundamental freedom guaranteed to the citizens of India, i.e. the freedom to choose the life they wish to live, which includes facets such as living with or without companion animals.

c)    If the residents that have pets are not violating any municipal or other laws, you cannot object. The general body cannot frame or amend bye-laws that are at variance with the laws of the country. Even by a complete majority, a general body cannot adopt an illegality. Please remember, you do not have the right to legislate, and ‘lay down law’ for residents, and apartment owners or even tenants.

Use of LIFTS by pets :

d)    There is a court ruling to the effect that pets cannot be disallowed from the use of lifts ; and no charges can be imposed either, by housing societies for the use of lifts by pets. In fact, it was widely reported in the news that the concerned court had ruled that “Dogs are family, can use lifts for free”. Kindly ensure that this sort of restriction is not therefore imposed – neither a ban, nor any special charges for the use of lifts by pets.

 Use of PARKS by pets :

e)    Banning pets from gardens or parks, is short-sighted. Firstly, you may or may not own the garden or park in question. It may be an MCD or DDA park, or belong to any other organization. Secondly, pets that are not properly exercised may show aggression in frustration ; and that, surely, cannot contribute to the benefit of the residents. It may be better to fix timings when pets can be walked without inconvenience to other residents. These timings can then be intimated to the general body.

Use of leashes/muzzles by pet owners, defecation by pets in community premises, imposition of fines and other similar measures :

f)     You can request pet owners to keep their pets on leash, when walking them in common areas. You cannot however ask for muzzles as muzzles are illegal for sustained use as dogs die through overheating. Please remember, the law already provides for penalties for negligent pet owners, which the aggrieved parties can avail of.

g)    In the absence of central or state laws requiring cleaning of pet poop by pet owners, you cannot impose any rule, regulation or bye-law, with respect to mandatory cleaning of pet poop, or impose special charges or fines on pet owners. You can, of course, request them to do so.

h)    You can also experiment with the creation of various pet defecation areas within community premises, which is what some housing societies and sectors are doing. These can be imaginatively spaced out within the precincts, and you can request pet owners to train their pets into using the same. You cannot however impose fines and special charges of any kind on pet owners, because there is no mandate in law for the same.

Intimidation :

i)     Lastly, please also always bear in mind that if any association succeeds in intimidating a pet owner into ‘giving up’ or ‘abandoning’ a pet, it will actually have contributed to a violation of law ; and may well be aggravating the menace of ownerless animals on the street, that are not accustomed to living on the street and therefore get involved in and lead to accidents, injuries and deaths. Please also bear in mind that intimidation is an offense in law.

II.         WITH RESPECT TO STREET DOGS :What you CANNOT do :-

1)         Beating and driving away street dogs, NOT ALLOWED ; animal birth control and release back into same locality/territory, ALLOWED :

As per Indian law street dogs (i.e. stray dogs) cannot be beaten or driven away or dumped elsewhere or killed. They can merely be sterilized in the manner envisaged in the Animal Birth Control (Dogs) Rules, 2001, vaccinated, and then returned back to their original locations. For the area-wise sterilization program that the law mandates shall be followed, dogs have to be returned back to their original habitat after sterilization and immunization.

2)         The rationale behind release into the same locality/territory :

Dogs, being territorial in nature, tend to fight off other dogs, and keep them from entering their territories ; and in this manner, the dog population in each territory / within each locale, stabilizes.If, however, they are removed permanently, other dogs come into the ‘dog-free’ vacuum that is thereby created. So the ‘problem’ continues.

3)         Street dog feeding, whether inside or outside community premises :

 There is no law that prohibits the feeding of street animals.Citizens who choose to do so are in fact performing a duty cast upon them by the Constitution of India – of showing compassion to all living creatures. As recently as the 12th of December, 2011, stray dog feeding has been upheld yet again by the High Court, and the emphatic challenge to the same by one R.W.A., disregarded.

4)         Animal cruelty :

Please also note, animal cruelty is an offence – under Section 11 of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act, and Section 428 of the Indian Penal Code –punishable with imprisonment and fine.

5)         Intimidation :

Attempts to interfere with, or harass persons who choose to tend to and feed community dogs, maybe tantamount to the very grave offence of criminal intimidation.

6)         Aggression to dogs, counter productive :

Last but not the least : any aggression or hostility that the dogs may be subjected to, will only render them aggressive, and hostile to humans. They may then resort to snapping and biting in self -defense. If the same happens, the human aggressors shall be the only ones to blame.

Posted in Animals, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, General/Animals, Medical treatment of Animals, Stories from Ground Zero, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

Is your neighbourhood street dog coughing off late? Sharing a treatment that may work

We have seen many dogs who are coughing really hard and continuously in this unbearable summer heat of Delhi-NCR, may be you have too…the cough could be because of dust-triggered Respiratory Infection, says our consultant veterinary doctor. It is painful to see the dogs coughing this way, trying as if they were to release something out that is stuck in their throat and often spitting out phlegm (‘balgam‘ as it is called in Hindi).

The treatment* we have successfully used to treat four dogs on the street over the past month and cure them off their cough is as follows, sharing here so that the readers of this blog can also make use of it:

  1. Go to your neighborhood chemist shop and purchase a strip of Ampoxin-500mg Capsules (it is an antibiotic medicine). A Strip of 15 capsules would cost you Rs.38 only.
  2. Give the coughing dog a 3 day antibiotic-course (3 days x 2 capsules daily) of this medicine. This means that you need to give the coughing dog one Ampoxin-500mg capsule in the morning and one in the evening for three consecutive days.
  3. How to give the capsule, so that the dog will consume the medicine? : Now this is the tricky part. Do not give the capsule as whole, the dog will spit it out and leave the food, who likes food with medicines anyways? :) Open the capsule, cut the capsule at its tip with a scissor and pour the capsule’s white colour powder in some paneer/cheese or sweet like gulab jamun.

*Please note: We are not doctors, but we are sharing this treatment protocol here because we have tried it successfully and we understand that it is very difficult to take each and every street dog to a vet or veterinary hospital for treatment. Many ailments, if detected early enough in street dogs, can be best treated on the street itself.

Posted in Against Animal Cruelty, Animal Birth Control (ABC) Programme/Street Dog Sterilization, Animal Laws of India, Animals, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Information that empowers!, News Reports, Street Dogs of India

Do-it-Yourself (DIY) Series-4: A Dossier of Indian Street Dog related laws and court rulings- Read, Print and Share widely

To all those who feed and take care of their neighbourhood street dogs in India, we have one request. Don’t feel weak. The laws are on your side and also in favour of the street dogs you care for.

In this post, we are sharing with you one comprehensive document that compiles all the laws, news-clippings and court orders/rulings, pertaining to street dogs

Please download this document by clicking here: A Dossier of Indian Street Dog related laws and court rulings

Save it, take print-outs and read it well.

These are updated laws, rules, orders pertaining to DOGS, their feeding and other rights. Most dog lovers don’t bother to read them and end up getting harassed while the law is strong and clear. Please keep a copy ready and if possible submit one copy in your local police station and the RWA, so unfortunate encounters can be averted beforehand. 

A point wise synopsis is also written in the beginning of this document.

We thank Citizens for Animal Rights for their effort in compiling this document and sharing the same with us. By posting it here, we are sharing it further and hope you all will share it widely too and feel empowered.

Remember: Your responsibility however doesn’t end with just feeding them, please also ensure that these dogs you care for are sterilized and vaccinated…since you are friendly with them, can touch them, it is much easier for you to collaborate with the NGO run Animal Hospital (that runs the local Municipality supported ‘Animal Birth Control’ Programme for street dogs) near your home to help undertake the sterilization of these dogs, it is just a one time exercise and will prevent you the agony of seeing pups dying (of illnesses and car accidents) in front of your eyes ever so frequently.

Posted in Animal Birth Control (ABC) Programme/Street Dog Sterilization, Animal Laws of India, Animals, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, General/Animals, Information that empowers!, News Reports

Do-it-Yourself (DIY) Series-3: Apply for the ‘Colony Caretaker of Animals-Card’ from Animal Welfare Board of India

AWBI website screenshot-information to dogfeeders, colony caretakers
AWBI website screenshot-information to dogfeeders, colony caretakers

Animal Welfare Board of India has decided to issue Identity Cards to Street Dog Feeders/Colony Care Takers of Animals who are taking care of animals in their locality.

A proforma of registration form can be downloaded from this link- http://awbi.org/awbi-pdf/caretakers.pdf or please click below.

AWBI Form for getting Colony Caretaker of Animals ID Card

Please download the form and send the duly filled in form along with the following:

– Two passport size photographs.
– Self -attested true copy of the Ration Card/ Voter ID/ Driving License/ Passport/ PAN Card

 to

ANIMAL WELFARE BOARD OF INDIA
(Ministry of Environment and Forests, Govt. of India)
Post Box No. 8672, 13/1, Third Seaward Road, Valmiki Nagar,Thiruvanmiyur, Chennai – 600 041

Colony Animal Cretaker Form_AWBI_English

Colony Animal Cretaker Form_AWBI_Hindi

A news report on the same in Indian Express dated 21st January 2013, by Senior Correspondent Kamala Kelkar,  is posted below. Please hoever note that the process may take less or more than a couple of weeks for you to receive your cards, as mentioned below

People who care for street dogs will soon be getting government-issued identity cards. The new ID cards are expected to do away with harassment faced by many such persons from the general public, when they try to feed canines on the road.

In a move that animal activists termed “unprecedented,” the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) has decided last week that anyone who voluntarily cares for strays — dog feeders and colony caretakers who tend to animals in their locality.

It Board has put up a one-page registration form (can be downloaded free of cost) on its website awbi.org, for those who want to get these ID cards.

The applicant needs to fill in personal information such as name, address and experience. Once the application is submitted, the ID card would be processed and mailed to the applicant, board member and legal advisor Anjali Sharma said.

“The card would have the person’s name and an attestation that he/she is doing a right and lawful deed and the Animal Welfare Board supports it. This lends credibility to the person,” Sharma said.

The AWBI is a legal advisory body that was formed under the Animal Prevention Act of 1960 to protect the animals.

Sharma explained that the goal of the card, which does not provide any exclusive rights, was solely the welfare of animals and caretakers.

“Most people don’t realize that sterilization and vaccination of stray dogs would be possible only through feeding and befriending dogs,” Sharma said.

In December 2011, the Delhi High Court had passed an order voicing its approval for designated “dog feeding spots” for stray canines in the city. It passed the order on a petition which sought to protect dogs from “intimidating” residents, so they could be fed without any hassle.

The court also ruled that police should assist dog feeders if they faced any “harassment” from residents and also ordered the AWBI to designate specific feeding areas.

Rishi Dev, founder of Citizens for Animal Rights who has written a book on “Urban disputes over animals”, said this was the first time that the government was supporting such an initiative.

Sharma hoped that many would come forward to apply for the cards. “They are performing a duty,” she said. “And it’s a legitimate exercise.”

Do-it-Yourself (DIY) Series-2: Educating your Residential Society on the scientific and lawful manner of dealing with street dogs

This template letter on Google Docs is kind courtesy of the Voice of Stray Dogs, Bangalore and makes for a good resource material for those of you trying to educate their own residential societies (RWAs i.e. Resident Welfare Associations) on the best possible legally correct, scientific and humane way of dealing with the ‘subject’ of street dogs in their colonies.

How to do this yourself?

Firstly, read these two articles to best understand the Rights of Street Dogs in India and the Delhi High Court rulings on the subject of feeding street Dogs, then save the images and the PDF Files embedded in these articles on to your computer, take a print out of these saved files and attach it as annexures to the above letter that you would draft and address to the concerned person in your RWA, seal the letter and send it across through courier or registered post, keep a photocopy of the same set with you. Be strong and fight it out intelligently, the laws are on your side and the dogs, just use your wisdom and intellect to drive the point across to the ‘uninformed’.

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions on the above subject (kind courtesy of People for Animals):

Q) Can people who feed animals in their areas be stopped by the RWAs or Societies or neighbours under the law ?

A) Article 51A of the Constitutional Law of India, speaks about the duties of every citizen of India. One of these duties includes having compassion for living creatures. So the animal lover is protected under the Constitution.

Article 19 of the Constitution of India, deals with right to freedom and in this freedom comes the right to profession, occupation, trade and business. Therefore, it means that every citizen has the right to occupation and if someone has taken the caring of animals as his occupation, it is legal and he has every right to carry on with  his occupation.

Article 21 of the Constitution of India states the right to personal life and liberty. Now this is the very vast right. If someone wants to feed dogs and provides shelter to the dogs, he has every liberty to do so. He has this right to liberty that the law provides to every citizen of India.

But, above every law and rights, there is a natural right too, which is a universal right, that is inherent in the nature of ethics and contingent on human actions or beliefs. It is the right that is claimed to exist even when it is not enforced by the government or society as a whole. It is the right of the individual and considered beyond the authority of a government or international body to dismiss. Therefore, if there are any rights at all, there must be right to liberty, for all the others depend on this. And, loving, caring and feeding and giving shelter to dogs, definitely is a natural right of any individual.

In a judgment passed by the Delhi Court, it has been stated that the Animal Welfare Board of India and the Municipal authorities have in the guidelines issued by them specified the problem often faced by the individuals and families who adopts stray animals and feed them and come to the assistance of such persons. The court says, that it is necessary to bring into record that these individuals and families who adopt stray animals are doing a great service to the humanity as they are acting in the aid and assistance of municipal authorities by providing these animals with food and shelter and also by getting them vaccinated and sterilized. Without assistance of such persons no local municipal authority can successfully carry out its ABC programs. The court has went on to say that the local police and the municipal authorities are under the obligation not only to encourage such adoption but also to ensure that such persons who come forward to take care of these animals specifically the community or neighbourhood dogs so that they are not subjected to any kind of cruelty.

And finally, the court has said that every individual has a right to live his life in the manner he wants and it is necessary that the society and the community recognizes it.

Q) Can an RWA/Society or any individual pick up the dogs in a colony that are sterilized and vaccinated and throw them away somewhere

A) Under the Government of India Animal Birth Control rules 2001 , no sterilized dogs can be relocated  from their area. Under 5 High Court orders , sterilized dogs have to be in their original areas. Even if the dog is not sterilized , the Society can simply ask an animal welfare organization to sterilize and vaccinate the dog. They cannot relocate him. Relocation is not permissible as it would cause more problems such as increase of dog bites as dogs are territorial by nature and fight to retain their areas keeping out other dogs.
Posted in Animals, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, General/Animals, Information that empowers!, Inspiration, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Stories from Ground Zero, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series-1: How do we pick up street dogs and take them to the nearest vet in our car

We are no experts and neither do we run an animal ambulance or hospital that tends to animals. We do it one street dog (or at best two or three) at a time and try to do our best in getting them treated/taking care of them and returning them back to the streets/areas where we picked them up/rescued them from.

We would like to share here what we have learnt, in our few years of doing this work on how best YOU can also try to pick an animal in need; place them in your car and take them to the nearest good vet for treatment/first aid.

Sometimes, a few regular visits to a good vet are all the injured street dog needs to recover back to full fitness. Also, try and learn some animal first aid yourself; and keep a first aid kit handy with regular medicines (please read this link: https://jaagruti.org/first-aid-for-dogs/)

Please remember sending each and every injured/ill animal to the animal hospital is NOT the solution. The animals recover better when treated on the streets, wherever possible, when tended to by animal lovers in the area and taken to vets, as advised periodically(and given supplementary medication mixed in food as advised by the vet) till they have completely recovered.

Some vets also do street dog sterilization surgeries (by prior appointments only) at their private clinics, at minimal costs for the dog lovers who tend to street dogs in their area and are willing to take care of the sterilized dogs in their homes for a few nights till they recover from the surgery, by sheltering them at their homes for this period of recovery. You need to find such good veterinary surgeons around your home so that tending to animals and getting them treated, sterilized and vaccinated doesn’t become a stressful chore for you, but rather a duty you perform with smile and satisfaction.

However, dogs do try to run away when they sense that you are trying to catch them…when they are injured, they may also tend to bite you, that is not because they hurt you, but because they are already in pain, that may have been inflicted by ‘humans’ only, and are thus less trusting of you

So here goes our checklist for catching an injured street dog and taking them for medical treatment:

 1. Make sure you are at least two people, as two are always better than one, when it comes to extending moral, emotional and physical support to each other…all of which is required when it comes to getting an injured animal treated.

2. Take some dry dog food with you to tempt the animal to you and allowing the animal to trust you to pet/touch them.

3. Equipments you will need to catch a dog:

a. A naada i.e. a cloth string/rope that is used to tie pyjamas here in India)- it works better than a muzzle and we use the same to tie the dog’s mouth and then take it around the neck and tie it at the back of the neck. The naada is gentle and better on the snout.

b. A dog leash (one with collar and one without collar)- the handle of the leash without the collar also acts as a good thing to put around the dog’s neck, while sliding the leash through it so that it becomes a lock.

c. Cover your car seats/floor with a waterproof cloth or/and old bed sheets to avoid getting your car covers/flooring dirty, as the dogs may vomit (due to motion sickness), pee/urinate or poo/defacate en-route, please be prepared for it (Do this preparatory work in your car before you go to rescue the dog).

4. Lifting the dog: Once the snout is muzzled and the leash is tied around their neck (which also gives us a chance to ensure that the dog doesn’t run away once we land at the vet’s clinic), and then lift the dog up in your arms by placing your hands across/under their chest to establish a tight grip as you lift them up. Yes, you are thinking right, you need to be physically strong and firm on your feet to lift dogs up in your arms this way.

5. Place the dog in your car: We take the dogs in our car, we have a Santro, we push down/fold down the backseat, so that the boot of the car and this space adds up and the dog has enough space. Sometimes, for small-sized dogs, we have used pet carriers; but mostly, we just place them in the car the above way and then when we reach our destination (the vet’s place/hospital)…once you have placed the dog inside your car, roll down the window just by a few inches (for ventilation) and not too much the dog tries to stick its neck out and run away.

Street dog being taken in our car for treatment at the nearest vet's clinic
Street dog being taken in our car for treatment at the nearest vet’s clinic

6. Also, try to ensure a crowd doesn’t gather (which may happen, as the dog being caught will try to scream as a defensive reaction); too many people crowding together will make the animal nervous. To disperse the crowd, take help of your team mates and gently try to explain them what you are doing and request them to disperse.

What we do? We have, through experience, learnt to talk and explain about such things gradually with different kinds of people; and when we are only trying to benefit a living being, what’s the shame in trying to answer curious queries…People do listen. While we request people to move inside their homes and not crowd about as the animal is in any case scared, some listen, some don’t and when they don’t, sometimes we have to be forceful and assertive in requesting them, while trying to make sure that we don’t enter into a fight by offending their sensibilities, its a test of patience we agree, but then it’s all worth it.

7. Once you reach the vet’s clinic, either request help from their paravets to take the dog from your car to the vet’s examination room/table. Or ensure that you lift the dog back into your arms carefully (taking care that all other windows/car gates are locked) and take him/her inside the clinic.

Please do share your experiences by writing to us at contact@jaagruti.org or posting comments below. This is just a synopsis of what we do and what works for us.

Thanks.

Posted in Animals, Articles/Posts in Hindi, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY) Series, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Information that empowers!, Medical treatment of Animals, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

First Aid tips for taking care of the dog on your street

Hands that help are better than lips that Pray!  (Image Courtesy: Helping Hands-http://www.fsgp.org/storage/HH_Image.jpg)

Volunteer to provide quick medical relief to the dog who guards your street

A horrifying number of dogs and cats die because of lack of medical attention.  This is all the more tragic because wounds and injuries are surprisingly simple to treat, once you’ve learnt how. Especially for very serious cases, the dog does not even need to be hospitalized.  With your help, street dogs can live a happy and healthy life.  Some of the most common problems that street dogs suffer from are skin infections, wounds and maggot wounds.  All these can be treated easily on site, unless of course the symptoms or the injury are very  severe when the dog needs to be taken to a vet or a shelter.

* Please note: This page will be regularly updated in both Hindi and English language for the benefit of those who care for their community dogs. However, it is to be noted that the information written in there is for informative purposes only. We request you to please do contact a veterinary doctor or take the animal to a shelter for thorough treatment if symptoms look grave.

For further queries or guidance, please write to us at contact@jaagruti.org or call on our helpline +91-9818 144 244

First Aid Kit:

Scissors, forceps, thermometer, chain to restrain the dog, tape to muzzle the dog (or buy a regular muzzle from a vet), adhesive tape, Gauze Bandages, cotton wool, bandages.

Medicines: Betadine Lotion and Ointment, Neosporin or Nebasulf  powder, Himax Ointment (a miracle medicine for animals) or Skinoment, Betnovate Skin Cream, Soframycin skin ointment, Ivermectin – 10 ml vial, Topicure spray, Scabnil Oleo, Neem oil, antibiotic such as Cifran 500 mg (for 20 kg dog), Avil tablets (25 mg or 50 mg -depending on the age and weight of the dog), Petmosol soap, Ecktodex or Ridd, Ivermectin tablets, sulphur powder, camphor powder, boric powder, coconut oil, kerosene oil, Cetrimide Lotion (Anti-allergic wash from Piramal Healthcare)

SKIN DISEASES This is the most common problem that dogs suffer from.  In the first instance, try and avoid them getting skin infections by taking precautions.  Give a pinch of sulphur in the dog’s food once a week.  You can also give a neem tablet (from Himalaya Drug Co.) once a week which is most effective too.  If we can help treat their skin infections, it would eliminate a great deal of suffering the dog undergoes. The most common diseases are mange and scabies and fungal infection. Most dogs can be treated at site. There are various treatments:

Treatment 1 (allopathic treatment)

  • If possible, give the dog a bath with Petmosol soap.  (Repeat once a week till the dog heals).
  • Apply Ektodex 1 tsp in 1 litre solution (or as instructed on the bottle). Note: As this medication is poisonous, do not let the dog lick himself.  Try and walk the dog till the medicine dries.
  • Antibiotics have to be prescribed as the constant scratching will have caused bacterial infections.  Amoxycillin can be given 2 times a day for three days along with Vitamin B capsules.  Avil can also be given to relieve the itching.

Treatment 2Do not apply this mixture on cats.

  • Mix Scabnil Oleo with an equal part of Neem oil.
  • Apply on the dog with a brush.  Repeat every 4 days.
  • The main ingredient of Scabnil Oleo is karanj oil which is a powerful anti-fungal agent.  Neem oil is also strongly anti-fungal.

Treatment 3(Home remedy)Warm Coconut oil and mix 10 cubes of camphor (camphor packet available in the market) and 1 tsp sulphur powder in it.  Then put in 1 tsp Boric powder in it and then kerosene oil and cool the mixture.  Apply the mixture on the dog’s skin, so that it reaches the hair roots. (You can clip the hair if you cannot reach the roots.   You can keep this mixture in a small glass bottle and repeat it until the dog is healed.

 

Some general points for skin diseases.Treatment 2 is very effective for parasitic skin disease like mange or scabies.  In general we have found Treatment 3 to be very effective in heat-related skin problems. This is because of the cooling properties of camphor. At the time of application this treatment may irritate the skin and make the dog restless, but this will pass off in an hour or two. Usually dogs do not try to lick these ointments because of the strong smell. However, to be on the safe side it might be a good idea to keep the dog muzzled during application.

 

WOUNDS (Prevention of maggot wounds)

You may be lucky enough to spot a wound before a housefly does. Do not neglect even a small wound especially if the dog cannot reach it to lick it since they are the ones which very quickly become maggot infested.  A gaping wound, however, is going to require stitches and the dog would be required to be taken to the vet.  If it doesn’t, then you can treat it yourself.

Medicine: Betadine lotion, Neosporin powder, Himax ointment.

Treatment:

1. Clean the wound with Betadine lotion.

2. Sprinkle Neosporin (or Nebasulf) powder liberally into the wound.

3. Put Himax on the wound liberally to keep away flies so that it doesn’t become a maggot wound. If the dog has a caretaker, try leaving Himax with him and tell him to apply it on the wound everyday until it heals.

MAGGOT WOUNDS. An open, round and deep wound with bleeding and which also gives out a foul smell are usually clear indication of a maggot wound (see image).  Since it is a painful procedure, the dog must be muzzled when it is being treated.  Do not treat head wounds but take the dog to a vet or a shelter.

An exhaustive article on treating Maggot wounds can be read here https://jaagruti.org/2013/08/06/treating-dogs-with-maggot-infestations/

Medicine: Ivermectin 10ml vial, Topicure Spray, Betadine lotion, Nebasulf/Neosporin Powder, Lorexane ointment, Himax

Treatment:

  • Put in Ivermectin (about 4-5 drops) in the wound.
  • You can also spray Topicure deep into the wound so that it irritates the maggots to emerge out. If maggots start to emerge, remove them with tweezers.
  • Then apply Nebasulf or Neosporin powder into the wound to heal and dry it.  Next apply Lorexane cream and fill the wound with this.
  • The final and most important layer is the ayurvedic fly repellant Himax cream. Apply it liberally all over the wound so that flies do not get to the wound again.
  • The next day if you can treat the wound again, you will need to repeat the same steps again.
  • Once the wound is a pink colour, you can just sprinkle Neosporin powder in the wound and apply Himax liberally on top of it until it heals.

How to tie a muzzle to treat a dog?

  • Use a long strip of material or a tape (not adhesive or any sticky tape, please)
  • Place the strip of material on top of the dog’s nose.
  • Loop the material under the dog’s chin and tie it into a knot.
  • Bring the ends of the material back behind the dog’s ears and tie into a bow on top of the head.

Remember: Use the muzzle only for treating a dog for a few minutes as the dog can get overheated.

If you have more time at hand, please watch the videos below (uploaded on You Tube by Voice of Stray Dogs) and listen to Dr. Pavan, Founder of Cessna Lifeline Veterinary Hospital in Bangalore. He explains in this two part series as to how to attend to and intervene effectively on Medical emergencies in Animals

* Please note: This information is for informative purposes. Please do contact a veterinary doctor or take the animal to a shelter for thorough treatment if symptoms look grave. For further queries or guidance, please write to contact@jaagruti.org or call us on +91-9818 144 244

First Aid for Dogs- text translated in Hindi can be read below

कुत्तों के लिए प्राथमिक चिकित्सा

सड़क पर रहने वाले कुत्ते और बिल्लियाँ अक्सर उपचार के आभाव में मारे जाते हैंयह बात बहुत  दुखद: हैक्योंकि उनकी मृत्यु का कारण रहे घाव व चोटें आश्चर्यचकित रूप से बहुत आसानी से ठीक किये जा सकते हैं, एकबार आप ने सीख लिया की यह उपचार कैसे किया जाए विशेषतः कुछ गंभीर स्थितियों मेंजब कुत्ते को अस्पताल में रखने की जरुरत नही होतीआप सडकों पर रहने वाले कुत्तों की सु:खद व स्वस्थ जीवन जीने में सहायता कर सकते हैं|

 

त्वचा सम्बन्धी संक्रमणघाव व कृम घाव वे सामान्य समस्याओं में से कुछ हैं जिनसे सड़क पर रहने वाले कुत्ते  सबसे अधिक पीड़ित होते हैंइन सभी समस्याओं  का आसानी से यथा स्थान उपचार किया जा सकता है (यद्यपि ये इतने गंभीर न हों की कुत्ते को पशुचिकित्सक या आश्रय स्थल में ले जाने की जरुरत हो )

प्राथमिक चिकित्सा किट (विषय-वस्तु):

एक बार आपके पास प्राथमिक चिकित्सा किट का सारा सामान हो तो आप किसी भी जरूरतमंद कुत्ते को समय पर चिकित्सा उपलब्ध कराने के लिए तैयार हैं नीचे दी गई औषधियाँ साधारण रूप से कुत्तों के लिए हैंऔर संग्रह करके भविष्य में उपयोग के लिए रखी जा सकती हैं यह सभी औषधियाँ किसी भी पशु-औषधि विक्रेता के पास उपलब्ध होती हैं |

 

कैंचीचिमटाथर्मामीटरकुत्ते को बंधने के लिए चेनकुत्ते का मुहं बंधने के लिए फीता (और पशु चिकित्सक के पास उपलब्ध नियमित मज़ल टेप खरीदें)चिपकने वाला टेपगाज़पट्टी रुई व टॉर्च. दवाइयाँ:: Betadine Lotion, Nebasulf or Neosporin powder, Himax Ointment (पशुओं के लिए एक चमत्कारी औषधि), turpentine oil and chloroform mixture), Topicure spray, Scabnil Oleo, neem oil, antibiotic such as Cifran 500 mg (for 20 kg dog), Avil tablets, Petmosol soap, Ecktodex or Ridd, sulphur powder, camphor powder.

 

घाव (बचाव कृम/मगट घावों से) आप भाग्यशाली होंगे यदि आप घाव को घरेलु मक्खी से पहले देख लेंछोटे से घाव को अनदेखा न करें यही घाव जल्दी कष्टदायक

इसके लिए आवश्यकता हैBetadine lotion, Neosporin powder, Himax ointment.

1. घाव को Betadine lotion से साफ करें 2Nebsulf  Powder या Neosporin Powder को उदारता से घाव पर छिड़कें    3. Himax घाव पर लगाएं यह मक्खियों को दूर रखेगा और घाव को कीड़ों वाला घाव नही बनने देगा| यदि कुत्ते की देखभाल करने के लिए कोई हो तो कोशिश करें की Himax Powder उसके पास रहेउसे घाव पर लगाने के लिए कहें जब तक घाव ठीक न हो जाए|

 

उपचार के लिए कुत्ते का मुहँ कैसे बांधें

  • कपड़े व किसी पदार्थ की लम्बी पट्टी, नाड़ा व टेप (ध्यान रहे यह चिपकने वाला टेप न   हो )  का प्रयोग करें
  • पट्टी को कुत्ते की नाक के ऊपर रखें |
  • पट्टी को कुत्ते की ठोडी के नीचे ले जायें व गांठ बाँध दें
  • पट्टी के दोनों सिरों कुत्ते के कानों के पीछे ले जायें कुत्ते के सिर पर एक बो बाँध दें |

कुत्ते का मुँह केवल उपचार के लिए कुछ मिनटों के लिए बांधें क्योंकि इससे कुत्ते के शारीरिक तापमान में वृद्धि हो सकती है, जो उसके लिए हानिकारक है |

 

त्वचा सम्बन्धी संक्रमण

यह सबसे साधारण समस्या है जो कुत्तों में पाई जाती है | सर्वप्रथम कोशिश करें की संक्रमण बचाव के द्वारा टाला जा सके | चुटकी भर सल्फर कुत्ते के खाने में हफ्ते में एक बार मिलाएँ, आप नीम की गोली (आयुर्वेदिक) दे सकते हैं जो बहुत ही प्रभावकारी है,  यदि हम इनके त्वचा संक्रमण का उपचार  कर सकें तो यह उस कष्ट को बहुत हद तक कम कर सकता है जिसे कुत्ता इस संक्रमण के समय सहन करता है Mange  Scabies  Fungal Infection कुत्तों में सबसे अधिक होने वाली त्वचा की बीमारियाँ हैं|अधिकतर कुत्तों का यथास्थान पर ही उपचार किया जा सकता हैइनके विभिन उपचार हैं |

 

उपचार 1 (एलोपेथिक उपचार)

1. अगर सम्भव है तो कुत्ते को Petmosol साबुन से नहलायें (इसे हफ्ते में एक बार दोहराएँ जब तक कुत्ता ठीक न हो जाए) 2. Ektodex 1 लीटर पानी में चम्मच (या बोतल पर जैसा निर्देशित है ) घोल कर कुत्ते के शरीर पर लगाएं |नोट: यह दवाइयाँ जहरीली हो सकतीं हैंकुत्ता इसे चाट न पाए कुत्ते को जब तक चलायें जब सूख न जाए |3. Anti-biotic दवाइयाँ भी दी जानी चाहियेंक्योंकि कुत्ते द्वारा लगातार खुजाने से बैक्टिरिअल इन्फेक्शन हो सकता है |.  Amoxycillin दिन में बार दी Vitamin B कैप्सूल के साथ दी जा सकती है |  Avil भी दे सकतें हैं |

उपचार 2. इस मिश्रण को बिल्लियों पर न लगाएं | Scabnil oleo को बराबर मात्रा में नीम तेल के साथ मिलाएंकुत्ते पर ब्रुश की सहायता से लगाएंहर दिन में इसे दोहराएँ |  Scabnil oleo में मुख्य सामग्री Karanj oil हैजो एक शक्तिशाली एंटी-फंगल एजेंट है |नीम का तेल भी लाभदायक एंटी-फंगल है |

उपचार 3.  Sulphur Powder व कपूर बराबर मात्रा में अच्छी तरह मिलाएं इसमें नारियल का तेल डालें और मिलाएंध्यान रहे इसमें गाँठें न पड़ेंएवं मिश्रण तरल गाड़ा बनेयदि यह अधिक गाड़ा व गांठवाला होगा तो कुत्ते के शरीर से गिर जाएगा और अधिक तरल होगा तो यह कुत्ते के शरीर पर फ़ैल कर नही लग पायेगा| मिश्रण को कुत्ते पर सिर से पीठ की विपरीत दिशा में लगाएं ताकि यह बालों की जड़ तक पहुँच सके, इसे न रगड़े केवल पर्याप्त परत ही लगाएं |  हर 4 दिन में इस प्रक्रिया को दोहराएँ जब तक कुत्ता ठीक न हो जाए |

  • उपचार २ पैरासिटिक त्वचा सम्बन्धी बीमारी जैसे Mange व Scabies में बहुत प्रभावशाली है सामान्य अवस्थाओं में हमने पाया है की उपचार नम्बर 3 गर्मी से संबंधित त्वचा की बीमारियों में प्रभावकारी है क्योंकि इसमे कपूर होने के कारण शरीर में ठंडक पहुचाने के गुण हैं, इसे लगाते समय
  • कुत्ते कभी-कभी कुछ असुविधा महसूस कर सकतें हैं, परन्तु यह एक से दो घंटे में सामान्य हो जाता  है |अधिकतर कुत्ते इसकी तेज गंध के कारण इसे चाटते नही परन्तु फिर भी लगाते समय कुत्ते का मुहँ बांधना ही उचित है |
  • यदि त्वचा में से पस निकल रही हो तथा बाल झड़ना व खुजली के अलावा कोई और लक्षण हों तो कृपया किसी पेशेवर की सहायता लें, अधिक गंभीर समस्याओं में वर्णित उपचार काफी नही होंगें, यद्यपि अधिकतर स्थितियों में यह उपचार कारगर होतें हैं, यदि इनमें से एक मरहम काम न करे तो दो या तीन सप्ताह बाद दूसरा आजमाएँ |

त्वचा रोगों पर कुछ सामान्य बातें

पेट्स व कम्युनिटी पेट्स का एंटी-रेबीज व डिस्टेम्पर के टीकों से वार्षिक टीकाकरण इन खतरनाक बीमारियों को दूर रखने के लिए किया जाना चाहिए |

  • पिस्सू व चीच्चड़ – Notix Powder का उपयोग करें |
  • अपने पेट्स की हर 4 माह में डी-वोर्मिंग करें, इसके लिए Praziplus या Drontol Plus की एक गोली 15 kg  के भार के कुत्ते को दे |
  • कुत्ते को गोली कैसे दें- इसके लिए सबसे सरल तरीका गोली को बर्फी,  गुलाब जामुन या पनीर के बीच में रख कर दें | वे दवाई को इनके साथ ही निगल जायेंगे
  • सामान्य शारीरिक तापमान – 101.5F |
  • अतिसार–20 kg के कुत्ते के लिए 2 Dependol की गोलियां |सूजन (उदहारण के लिए पैर में व कुत्ता लंगड़ा रहा है ) यदि हड्डी टूटी है तो, कृपया कुत्ते को पशु चिकित्सक के पास ले जाएँ, यदि यह सिर्फ़ सूजन है तो Voveron की एक गोली दिन में दो बार जब तक दें जब तक की सूजन खत्म न हो जाए |

कृपया खुराक की मात्रा कुत्ते के आकार अनुसार तय करें |

*अस्वीकरण: यह सूचना मात्र जानकारी हेतु है,  संदेह की स्थिति में कृपया अपने पशु चिकित्सक से सम्पर्क करें.

For further queries or guidance, please write to us at contact@jaagruti.org or call on our helpline +91-9818 144 244

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