Posted in First Aid Service, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Stories from Ground Zero, Street Dogs of India

A dog with a swollen face – Our First Aid Service at work!

Chowki_Jaagruti_Swollen Face

Have you all started wondering if our On-site First Aid Service for Street Animals only tends to maggot cases?

Well, not really…meet this brown coloured male street dog whom we spotted near a neighbourhood Police chowki on 14th August. His face was swollen like a pumpkin and his eyes were hardly opening! It was food that helped us win his heart over and we were able to begin treatment. By Day 3, the size of his face has returned to its normal size.

We have attended to such cases before so knew that this swelling of the face was possibly due to pus accumulation. And the pus accumulation was courtesy the fungal infection he had in his left ear due to this horrible humid weather, which would have caused him to shake his head constantly and this swollen pus filled face as a result.

Please take note of what we are sharing next.

Pus accumulated in any part of the body will always try to make its way out by making an opening/hole in the body. In this Chowki dog’s case there were three openings too, a big hole in the left ear and then two smaller ones over the forehead and above the left eye. These openings need to be tended to as well, cleaned and dressed up else its a recipe for an upcoming disaster, yes, you guessed it right, screw-worm flies love this pus and would have soon sat on it to lay eggs and convert this into a maggot wound!

Consider contributing to JAAGRUTI™ to help us sustain our On-site First Aid Service for Street Animals.

We would be able to expand our reach only if people contribute. We have been an entirely self-funded effort thus far and working quietly on the ground since around 6 years now.

You can contribute online through https://jaagruti.org/contribute-to-jaagruti/ ormake a Bank Transfer, details of which are mentioned below:

Account Name: JAAGRUTI
Bank Account Number (Current Account):1710002100550190
Bank Name: PUNJAB NATIONAL BANK
Bank Branch Name (with Code): (171000) LOCAL SHOPPING CENTRE, PITAMPURA
Bank Branch Address: LOCAL SHOPPING CENTRE, PITAMPURA, DELHI-110034
RTGS/NEFT/IFS Code: PUNB0171000

Please note: Request you to drop in a mail to contribute@jaagruti.org when you make the RTGS transfer/NEFT transaction with your complete name, address, amount transacted (transaction reference number) and your PAN Card no. so that we can track the same and acknowledge it gratefully. Thanks

Posted in Animals, General/Animals, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Stories from Ground Zero, Street Dogs of India

Treating an old dog with Aural haematoma- Part 2

Dateline: October 2012

Two years back, we had penned a story on how we got an old black dog’s aural haematoma treated.

We had a smilar challenge to face with another old dog, a brown coloured male dog with a very peculiar personality disorder, which is that he wants you to love him, but he is cared of being touched. How does one take a dog with such a feeble heart in one’s car to the doctor’s clinic? We were in a dilemma, confused.

We tried to catch him many a times to take him to the vet’s place, just seeing us approaching him with a leash, he would start screaming on the top of his voice as if the leash was to strangle him.

We were sure we didn’t want him operated (i.e surgically treat him) for this aural haematoma, neither that dog or we had the hearts to brave it.

We discussed this with our trusted vet and requested him to send across his paravet with us to the street where this brown dog lives, the vet agreed and we decided that the best way forward was to aspirate the accumulated fluid out of the dog’s right swollen ear flap and insert antibiotics in the ear flap, that would help dry the fluid and heal the haematoma.

Moral of the story thus far: Have full faith in yourself and conviction in the choices you make. Then march ahead. More often than not, things will fall in place

This is what happened thereafter after the paravet arrived on the spot to execute the plan of medical-action.

Attempt 1: We tried to lure the dog to me with dog food, he came, ate and tried to run away and we couldn’t entice him to come near the paravet for he, i.e. the dog, smelt danger!

Attempt 2: We tried to lure the dog to me with dog food and distracted him, and the paravet from behind threw the leash around  the dog’s neck and using all our force, we managed to hold that dog in that steady position.

The paravet took position and a syringe (plunger with needle) was inserted into the swollen portion of the ear flap by the paravet and the fluid that had accumulated in the dog’s ear flap was sucked out (aspirated) and thrown away. The process was repeated (while keeping the needle fixed on the flap and just removing the syringe’s plunger portion) till the fluid was sucked out (as much as it could be).

Then a mixture of antibiotic Gentamycin and injectable medicine Prednisone (an anti-inflammatory drug that also promotes healing) was injected into the ear flap through that same needle which was left on the ear flap.

Apparently, as explained to us by the paravet, Prednisone as a medicine helps dry the fluid and heal such wounds.

And it worked, it has been a month since this exercise was undertaken and the flap though is now bent, it doesn’t have any fluid accumulated inside it.

This is how it all looks.

The Old Brown Dog’s right ear: Post non-surgical aspiration of aural haematoma fluid [Image (c) Jaagruti]

In the end, something to share…We at ‘Jaagruti’ often get questioned on our helpline number by many a rowdy people as to what we actually do, we tell them to read it on these pages on this blog (About Jaagruti, Contact Us and Animal Helplines in Delhi and NCR), we have clearly written on these pages what we are and what we are not, we have nothing to hide.

We don’t run an ambulance or a veterinary hospital, we don’t run a shelter, Jaagruti is a little effort wherein we try to share information and empower you, we try to listen to you when you call, we may not always have an answer, we are young and still learning, but we will always try to guide you with the best possible solution based on our understanding of the subject or issue and help you do what we aim to do, inspiring you to do a good deed a day. For we believe that if everyone were to do that, it will be a good day for many in need.

“Try to make at least one person happy every day. If you cannot do a kind deed, speak a kind word.

If you cannot speak a kind word, think a kind thought.”- Lawrence G. Lovasik 

And remember to smile, despite all the hardships that exist and you face, you’re beautiful and so is this world.

Posted in Animals, Information that empowers!, Medical treatment of Animals

Medicine list to cure a dog who has had a paralytic attack*

Before this information gets erased of our memories, we also wanted to share the list and dosage of medicines that our doctor advised us to give to Hasmukh, when we were hoping against hope that he is unable to walk because he has had a paralytic attack, and not because he had the fatal spinal cord fracture as we came to know much later when we took him to the doc.

Maybe the information shared below, on the medicines that have the potential to cure dogs who have suffered from  a paralytic, will help some of you somewhere in curing a dog in need:

Homeopathic Medicines:

1. Arnica 1M-Morning-10 to 15 small ball tablets

2. Ruta 1M-Afternoon-10 to 15 small ball tablets

3. Rustox 1M-Evening-10-15 small ball tablets

Ayurvedic Medicines

Shilajeet Gel: 1 drop daily to be put on the tongue of the dog

Allopathic Medicine

Methycobal 500 mg- 1 Capsule in the morning and 1 Capsule in the evening

*Disclaimer: Our doc did tell us that all three medicines above could be given as a combination. However, if you were to ever use this info, please do consult your vet beforehand and show the dog to a veterinary medicine expert and take his opinion. Kindly note that he information above is solely being shared for informational purposes.

Posted in Be the Change, Bird Rescue, Bird Rescue and Treatment, Do you know?, Information that empowers!, Inspiration, Man and Animal: Stories of Kindness, Medical treatment of Animals, Pets, Relationships, Stories from Ground Zero

The joy of looking after ‘Poopy’ the pigeon

By Divya Kapur

About the author: Divya has trained as a wildlife rescuer in Sydney with Sydney Metropolitan Wildlife Services. She specialises in birds and that is where she derives the confidence to continue her work in this area after having moved back to Gurgaon. She would love to share her expertise and knowledge with like minded people. Those interested in learning tips about bird care, may please contact her on divya_kapur@hotmail.com

——–

As I sat outside in my garden, thinking of my pet bird that is in Sydney, awaiting paperwork before it flies to India, a pigeon flies out of a tree and falls on the ground, as if it ran out of ‘steam’.

'Poopy' - the Pigeon (Photo Credit: Divya Kapur)

I waste no time in jumping out of my chair to take a closer look. The pigeon sits still, showing no signs of wanting to fly away. As it sees me coming closer, it starts to walk away, looking for a dark corner for comfort and safety. I immediately knew that this poor fellow is not well. By this time, I also figured that it is a female.

I wait for it to get into a corner of my patio, just behind a pedestal fan. That is when I reach out with my right hand, grab her gently from behind and turn her upside down. I hold the pigeon’s head in the cup of my left hand to keep its eyes covered. Birds are very visual. It can go into a state of panic and even shock to see itself in the hands of a human being. By covering its eyes with one hand or even with a muslin cloth, I am able to calm the bird. This way I am better able to examine it for injuries.

As I had suspected, the pigeon has hurt itself on his right foot. Not bad but it had scratched itself enough to bleed. Fortunately for me, my very helpful daughter, equally passionate about birds and animals, is home because of summer holidays. She is quick on her heels to get some cotton wool, clean water in a plastic bowl (small container in which you get soan papdi…we also believe in and encourage recycle, reuse and reduce policy) and Dettol. We gently cleaned the wound with clean water, making sure all along that the bird is calm and not stressed. I still have its eyes covered for that.  Then I cleaned it with cotton wool dipped in diluted Dettol water mix.

I then put the pigeon back in the corner where it felt safe and secure, while my daughter and I got busy in preparing a large box to house the pigeon. After all, it wouldn’t be a sound idea to leave her out in the open, unable to fly and unsupervised.

I got a cardboard box. Thank God I have plenty as I have recently moved from Sydney. Any plastic basket with holes will also do. Make sure it is large and not claustrophobic. Go by your own instinct. I lined the bottom with plastic bag, topped with a couple of newspaper sheets. Now comes the interesting bit. My daughter then spread soft leaves and grass on one half of the box, bearing in mind what the pigeon is used to in the wild. The idea is to provide the bird with what it is familiar with, to make it feel ‘at home’.

'Poopy' feels at home (Photo credit: Divya Kapur)

In one corner we put another reusable plastic container for water. Remember to put some clean stones at the bottom of the bowl so it does not tip over. Then we spread some bajra all around for the pigeon to feed on. We then carefully picked the bird up again, as before and put him in his new home to recover.

The wounds healed in about two weeks. By now, the pigeon was active and alert. She would spring up to see us walk by. Every morning and evening, I would put the box outside in the garden for the pigeon to get fresh air and see other birds. During the day, the box was placed in a covered shady spot. The water was cleaned every two days and the paper was changed every 3-4 days, depending on how much mess our little feathery patient made.

It’s been a month now and I lovingly call her ‘Poopy’. Unfortunately, the poor bird has a problem with its right wing. But the good news is that she is out of her box. She has found comfort on top of our linen cupboard and that is where she lives along with its water and food bowl. I am not surprised at her natural instinct to be above us and in a cosy corner. That is how they live when outside.

I am still looking for an avian specialist to diagnose the problem correctly and suggest the next course of action for us. Meanwhile, I am not stressed about whether it will survive or not. That is beyond my control. All my family and I can do is keep it safe because a bird that can’t fly is a bird that will either become another bird’s dinner or run over by a car.

For now, all you bird lovers out there, I am sure you now know that it’s not difficult to look after a pigeon and definitely does not cost anything at all. You can do it yourself in the comfort of your own home. . There are lots of birds that get injured, are sick or abandoned and orphaned. It’s not difficult to look after them. All it needs is some basic knowledge, lots of enthusiasm and love.

Posted in Animals, Information that empowers!, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Pets, Street Dogs of India

Elbow rashes in street dogs- the ‘magic’ cure!

Our patient: A dog with elbow rashes in his forelegs

See the photograph above, it is of our neighbourhood street dog who had been having these elbow rashes in both of his fore legs, as time passed by and rains  intensified last year this infection spread on to the whole of his front forelegs. We took him to one doctor after the other and met with no success, he was repeatedly administered antibiotics and we were advised to orally administer him Avil (Anti-allergc drug), Ampoxin, Topclav and so many other medicines at various intervals by so many of the vets we consulted, but over a period of 3 months we met with no success at all!

 
But finally a vet asked us to follow the below mentioned external treatment protocol for this infection every alternate day and we are happy to share that after a month and a half of diligently following this medical treatment protocol, this dog was cured of its elbow rashes and thats the reason we wish to share it with you all:
 
1. Wear gloves
 
2. Mix a few crystals of Potassium Permanganate (KMNO4) in filtered water. (You can get these crystals from your local chemist shop). KMNO4 is a disinfectant.
 
3. We then cleansed the whole infected portion on this dog’s forelegs with cotton swab dipped in the Potassium Permanganate solution.
 
4. We then took an empty syringe and filled it with H2O2 (Hydrogen Peroxide)- you can get a suspension for this at your local chemist shop.
 
5. Then it was time to gently release the H2O2 droplets from the syringe onto the infected portion cleansed with KMNO4 solution, we saw bubbles but that wasn’t a reason to worry, as its just a chemical reaction happening between H2O2 which is a mild acid with KMNO4…but we identified that perhaps it is this ‘magic’ step which actually helped kill the infection causing microbes on this dog’s legs.
 
6. After having repeated step 5 for all infected portions on this dog’s legs, we were advised to rub oodles and oodles of  Himax ointment (An Ayurvedic veterinary ointment) mixed with equal portions of Spectrazole ointment onto the whole of the infected portion. We made sure we were wearing sturdy gloves during this process.
 
7. We repeated steps 1-6 every alternate day for this dog and the result is there to see in the photograph below.
The elbow portion of the dog-post treatment
 
 
Posted in Animals, Information that empowers!, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Pets

Ear infections in Street Dogs-our experience at treating them

Come rains, comes humidity and mositure in the air, the ideal weather for microrganisms like bacteria, yeast and fungi to proliferate. How often have you seen a dog walking with his/her head titled to one side or continuously shaking its ear? If you do see any dogs exhibiting the above symptoms or scratching its ear with a wall or body of a car, our advice is do not ignore that sight, if you do care for the well being of that street dog…for this could well be an indicator that the dog is battling with a microbial infection in its ear.

We at Jaagruti had two such doggy patients to attend to in the past month and in this post we share what we did to get their infection treated.

Case 1: We saw a dog walking with its head tilted to its left, he was badly shaking his head and was in visible pain. On closer examination we found that his external ear had pus accumulated in it. Though the dog was friendly, we took no chances and tied his mouth with a cloth string and then using cotton dipped in Betadiene solution went about clearing his ear as much as possible of the accumulated pus, which if not removed would have served as an ideal breeding ground for more insects and flies and could have also resulted in maggot infestation in the dog.

We kept on changing the cotton swab till we were able to clear most of the pus and then we tried to trace the location from where the pus was oozing out from and noticed that it was coming out from a spot in the ear lobe. The first aid treatment in the form of clearing of this pus from the dog’s ear visibly relieved the dog and he was now much ata ease and trusted us to put him in our car and take him to our consultant vet. At the vet’s clinic, after an examination it was found out that this dog was suffering from Yeast infection in its ear and that was what had caused the Pus. At the vet’s clinic, a thorough cleansing of both the ears of that dog was done (yes, we got both ears cleansed, even though the pus infection was just in one year), two  injections followed, one an antibiotic and the other being Belamyl (a Multi-Vitamin injection) and then the doctor advised us to administer ear drops into the Dog’s ear for a course of 3 days.

We were advised by our vet to administer Cipla’s Otibact Ear Drops into that dog’s ears-these ear drops contain Enrofloxacin and Silver Sulfadiazine, costs Rs. 80 for a 15 ml bottle. These ear drops are used in case of canine external ear infections complicated by yeast/fungi/bacteria.  The ear drops look more like a white emulsion and contains drugs that inhibit the multiplication of the microbe by acting on the enzymes involved in that microbe’s DNA Replication process). The dose prescribed by our vet was 4-5 drops of Otibact once daily targeted into the ear lobe and then we were advised to rub the ear so that the drops get rubbed into the ear skin properly.

We religiously administered these ear drops, and the dog’s ears were fit and fine again and had even regained their original shape and were back to being standing ears again from the floppy ones! :)

We also learnt that ear infections are more common in dogs with floppy/bent ears than those with standing ones as shade and mositure are easily available in a floppy ear which are ideal conditions for microbial infection, whereas in dogs with standing ears, there is more access to air and light.

Case 2: Involved a middle aged female dog who was continuously scractching her ears and shaking her head vigorously. On closer examination of her ears, we found a coat of dry powdery looking ear skin in both her external ears. To fix this problem we followed a simple course of administering her a set of ointments for a period of 3 days before she was fit again.

Treatment course followed is mentioned below:

Wear gloves, muzzle the dog and then squeeze ample amount of Spectrazole (anti-fungal, anti-microbial) ointment , mixed with some bit of Betadiene ointment onto the gloves and rub it onto the inner part of the dog’s ear flaps, then gently rub the dogs ears from outside in such a way that the ointment spreads itself all over the infected portion. Just make sure that you do this with gentle hands, because even street dogs like us, don’t like their ears pulled for no reason :)

Please remember that since we are dealing with street dogs in both the above cases and if you happen to be doing something similar, it is important that our first effort is to restrain these dogs using a muzzle or a cloth string, if need be even gently cover their eyes with dark wet cloth, this will help calm the animal down while you put drops or rub ointment into their ears.

Posted in Animals, Environment, Medical treatment of Animals, Pets, Street Dogs of India

Limping Dogs: A treatment we used that worked!

Many a time we at Jaagruti have come across street dogs with a limp in either their hind (back) legs or the fore (front) legs. The cause for these limping legs is not difficult to guess, more often than not it is inflicted by humans whereby dogs get hit by vehicles or often it is self-inflicted when the severely territorial street dogs acting macho enter into ‘dog fights’ to shoo other street dogs from intruding into their areas.

But, since it is practically impossible to pick up all limping street dogs and take them to a vet to get antibiotics and painkillers administered for a course of 3-4 days, we were looking for a simpler method to treat such dogs, a method which gives us the flexibility to treat them on the street with minimal fuss.

Thankfully, while exploring such options, our consultant vet suggested we try out a veterinary liquid syrup based medicine named, ‘Petcam’/now renamed ‘Melcam’ (Brand of CIPLA) or ‘Melonex’ (Brand of INTAS). For Rs.50-Rs.80 for a 10 ml bottle depending on the brand one buys, it was and is not a strain on the pocket either.

As we purchased our first bottle of Petcam/Melcam/Melonex, our eyes noticed its key ingredient, which was ‘meloxicam’ (also the more generic name of this medicine). Meloxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is also the substitute advised in place of ‘Doclofenac’.

A poster being used to make public aware of using 'Meloxicam' in place of 'Diclofenac' as a veterinary drug/painkiller (As Diclofenac administration to cattle is being held responsible for the decline in vulture population that feeds carcasses of cattle that had been administered Diclofenac)

‘Diclofenac’ is a veterinary drug (commonly used in cattles) which is now being held responsible for the decline in India’s vulture population, prompting the Indian Government to ban its sale. Latest news reports and studies validate say that this ban on use of Diclofenac has proved effective.

Now coming back to how we have used the bottle of Petcam medicine to cure 6 dogs with limping legs over the past few months.

Petcam, as the bottle cover says is used for control of osteoarthritis assoiated (i.e bone related) pain in dogs. Petcam Oral Solution can be used on a long-term and continuous basis (but what is advised is that you follow the veterinary doctor’s advice depending upon the severity of the limp), as obviously Petcam can’t cure fractured bones!

Petcam-Oral-Suspension-Meloxicam

Follow the directions for using this medicine provided by your veterinarian. Use Petcam Oral Suspension exactly as directed.

The dosage of Petcam to be given to street dogs is easily adjusted according to the dog’s weight. This medicine box comes with a syringe marked with gradation from 1ml to 10 ml.

The medicine is usually administered as a single dose of 0.2 mg/kg body weight (i.e 1ml of this suspension for every 10 kg of dog weight) on the first day of treatment. Thereafter it is administered once daily as 0.1 mg/kg.

For example: If the dog weighs around 30 kgs, the dose that needs to be given to him on Day 1 would be 6 ml followed by 3ml doses for the next 2-3 days. Normally clinical signs of improvement would be noticed by  Day 4 of treatment.

The oral suspension can be either mixed with food or placed directly into the dog’s mouth. The way we have preferred to give it is by putting it in diluted milk placed in a plastic vessel.

Chintu

Of the many dogs we have administered Petcam succesfully, one of the cases has been that of Chintu, a street dog who with his habit of sleeping underneath cars was constantly limping around with one or the other leg of his. Chintu’s condition was brought to our attention by two families caring for him residing on the ground floor of the very building whose stairs are Chintu’s home. Beginning with a 4 ml dose on Day 1 followed by 2ml doses over the next three days, we were successfully able to get Chintu back on his feet.

Another case was that of a dog, whom we found on a road divider next to  Dilli haat, Pitampura, he had such a severe limp that one of his hind legs was completely bent and lifted upwards.

On Day 1 we gave him a 6ml dose of Petcam followed by 3 ml doses for the next few days till he was able to put his feet back on the ground.

Petcam can also be served in a minimal dose of just 1-2 ml mixed in diluted milk (every alternate week) to an old street dog in your area who is having troubles walking either due to his age or due to his weight.

However, like all medicines, it is advised that you use Petcam with discretion. Please also note that it is not recommended to use Petcam Oral Suspension in pregnant and lactating dogs or in dogs younger than 6 months of age.

Posted in Animals, Information that empowers!, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Street Dogs of India

Treating an old dog for Aural Haematoma (Haematoma of the Ear)

Dateline: July 2010

The patient is an Indian Street Dog aged around 12 years or so.

His colour is Black so as per a general thumb rule, most Indian dogs who are black in colour and adopted by their communities get just one name: ‘Kaalu’. If one was to translate that into English, ‘Kaalu’ would read as Blackie.

On 2nd July, 2010, we noticed Kaalu walking on the street with his head tilted towards the left. We went closer, he was in visible discomfort. We went even further and tried to check his ears, fearing he had a maggot infestation in his left ear. But what we saw was something different- his pinna (ear flap) was swollen which was causing it to be heavy and thus Kaalu was walking with his head titled/hanging at one end.

This condition is referred to as ‘Haematoma of the ear’ or ‘Aural Haematoma‘. An Aural Haematoma is a blood clot in the ear; aural refers to the ear, and a haematoma is a localized collection of blood or serum. It is the swelling of ear because of fluid accumulation between the ear membrane because of rupture of a blood vessel. Why exactly this happens is not really known, it could be due to vigorous shaking of the head, the scratching of ear next to an infected metal object, like a car or even on the walls, it could also be due to an infection by the mites.

A close up shot of an Aural/Ear Haematoma in a Dog (file photo from the Internet)

Kaalu is an old dog, we at Jaagruti thus took a mutual decision of not putting him through a surgery for this haematoma as subjecting him to sedatives at this age would just be a tad too risky.

We consulted on of our vets for this case, and he advised us to put Kaalu on Medicines for the first 5 days and note whether the haematoma increases or reduces in size.

This was the doctor’s prescription for the first 5 days:

1. Two capsules of Ampilclox 500 mg, once in the morning and once at night

(Open the capsule and put the medicine powder in something sweet and edible to help the dog eat it, else it is very bitter)

2. Remember to supplement this with one capsule of Vitamin B-12/B-complex daily as Ampiclox is a strong antibiotic that can otherwise also harm the dog’s kidneys and liver

3. Clean the infected ear daily and apply a liberal dose of Betadiene ointment on the infected ear to prevent any further re-infestation of any other insets or mites on it

The haematoma neither reduced nor increased in size.

On 7th July, 2010: we decided to non-surgically treat Kaalu’s haematoma and took him to the vet and requested him to aspirate the fluid out, i.e drain the fluid out of Kaalu’s ear.

We covered Kaalu’s eyes with a dark cloth and tied a light muzzle around his mouth. The vet inserted a hypodermic needle to drain the fluid that had accumulated in the ear by pricking through that spot after cleansing the ear with spirit and then compressing the pinna to prevent accumulation of haematoma fluid.

The vet then repeatedly flushed the ear with saline and Gentamycin and some other antibiotics to help cleanse the internal tissue where the blood had accumulated.

The vet reassured us that these antibiotics will help heal the wound and the fluid won’t accumulate again if Kaalu allows himself to bandaged across his ears. We did that but that was to no avail as Kaalu was feeling discomforted after being bandaged around and he removed it by trying to scratch himself around on the walls. We them removed the bandage on our own and hoped that the fluid won’t accumulate again

Another visit to Kaalu a week later and we noticed that his ear had swollen again, so on 17th July, 2010, we took Kaalu to the vet again and this was followed by another round of non-surgical aspiration/draining out of haematoma fluid- but this time there was no fluid, but rather just the antibiotics that had been put into his ear the last time to help the blood vessels clot.

Then again a few days later we noticed the swelling again on Kaalu’s ear and honestly, we didn’t want to put the old dog through the trouble of travelling to the vet again.

So, on 27th July 2010 we consulted with another senior vet and explained him the situation, he suggested that we give him a doze of an antibiotic medicine, a tablet named Bidanzen Forte, twice daily for 5 days. Bidanzen Forte is an anti-inflammatory drug i.e it helps reduce inflammation and swelling due to blood accumulation and also helps heal a wound.

This just did the trick for us as the swelling in his ear completely subsided though the ear has got a bit deformed following this.

It has been two months now and there has been no relapse of the haematoma, although Kaalu’s ears differ in their appearance now–while the pinna of the right ear is straight, upright and also notched (because he is a sterilized dog) while the left ear which had haematoma is now bent over or curved and floppy.

Kaalu's ear as it looks today-post non-surgical drainage of haematoma

This is what Kaalu’s  left ear look likes now internally (post-recovery from haematoma), though it is slightly mis-shapen and is termed as ‘cauliflower’ ear because a lot of boxers suffer from this too.

Physical beauty doesn’t really matter or does it? not for Kaalu, he is fine with the weight of his ear now and we at Jaagruti are happy that we didn’t have to put Kaalu through a painful surgery at this age and so is he we think!

P.S: Though we at Jaagruti have shared exactly what transpired when we got this case treated and shared it here for all of yours information, we would still suggest that you consult your veterinarian for treating haematoma, while understanding that there are various options available to treat the same, depending upon the severity of the infection and age of the patient.

Posted in Animals, Jaagruti's interventions, Medical treatment of Animals, Pets

Treating a dog for a wasp/bee sting

This post comes out of sharing one of our experiences on dealing with insect bites on dogs and since insect bites are often misunderstood though it can be such a common reason behind sudden ailments in dogs/pets- what with most canines having a habit of sniffing around and poking their faces in the most wierd and strangest of places all the time for their pleasure. We are not offering any common solution to these cases but rather just wish to narrate our ignorance when suddenly faced with a situation like this in which we were left wondering what is wrong with the dog right till the time we reached the vet.

Wasp/bee stings on your dogs/pets could be dangerous and very painful to deal with: Contact a vet asap.

On 25th July, 2010 we were faced with a very confusing case of an approximately 7 month old young dog who suddenly started to yelp after splashing in the water placed in the water bath placed outside.

He started to run around with his tail pointed downwards and was pacing up and down in a  frenzied manner.

Within about 10 minutes, he started vomiting and the vomiting continued at an interval of one each every 10 minutes for the next one hour and after that he vomited twice with portions of blood and phlegm in the vomit. All this while we were trying to flush his mouth with cold water and even trying to force feed him water in the hope that if he has ingested something wrong, the same will get drained out one way or the other but nothing helped improvise his condition.

We were deeply worried and called the vet, in any case it was a Sunday so the first vet we called refused to tell us anything on the phone!

We kept trying and then got through two of our trusted veterinarians- and then narrated the chain of events to them. They said the symptoms we were sharing point to case of the dog ingesting something ‘poisonous’. Both of the vets asked us to give him some vanilla ice cream but the dog won’t have or even lick any of it and the vomiting wasn’t stopping either.

We called the vet again.

They asked us to give a few drops of Perinorm syrup to the dog (Perinorm is supposedly a medicine that helps stop vomiting).

Perinorm did help stop the dog’s vomiting and he slept for the next hour or so and then we had another shock in store when the dog woke up and started licking himself, we suddenly noticed that his genital organs swelled and so did his lips and eyes which were getting drastically swollen by the minute. Effectively, all the mucous membranes were showing swelling.

We were then asked to give the dog a 50mg Avil tablet.

By then it was two and a half hours since our agony had started with the suffering dog the vet- nearest to us reached his clinic on a torrid Sunday afternoon (much ahead of his schedule) and we rushed the young dog to the clinic.

While we were taking the dog to the vet’s clinic in the car, he began panting and we noticed that there was a blood-red long sting bite mark on the left side of his tongue.

We reached the vet and finally we realised that the young dog had become a victim of a possible wasp/bee sting while he was splashing around in the water bath while drinking water from the same. Te doctor promptly gave the young dog a set of anti-histamine injections and within fifteen minutes, the swelling on his lips, eyes and genital organs subsided and the dog was visibly relieved and looking far more comfortable, though he was still a bit subdued and sluggish in his movements.

Then the vet suggested that we feed the dog a powdered ‘charcoal’ tablet soon after as charcoal tablets help cleanse the body of all toxins sticking on the surface of the internal organs, we promptly did so and the dog eliminated all the toxins (supposedly) in his next faeces (which obviously was dark and partly black in colour).

Dime-sized charcoal tablets have long been used to treat stomach ailments. These tablets contain no chemicals and deliver about 250 milligrams of charcoal in each tablet. NetDoctor, a website that commissions material from United Kingdom health professionals, says charcoal tablets can relieve flatulence, gassy bloating, heartburn and upset stomach by attracting excess gas in the stomach and intestines. The gas binds to the surface of the charcoal and the tablet is digested. According to NetDoctor, charcoal tablets can be used to treat drug overdoses and poisonings. The charcoal absorbs chemicals and toxins the same way it does excess gas.

The young dog was back to his usual self in a day or two soon after all the toxins were flushed and elimnated out of his body.

And so this basically sums up our first experience of dealing with a dog stung by a wasp/bee.

We would like to summarise and share the main learnings we had from this experience below:

1. Dogs are playful animals and are often found sniffing and exploring unusual places. They tend to sniff under the bins, below the ledges, dark and mysterious corners and love digging up the soil. These places are homes to a number of insects and these insects bite the unsuspecting, curious dogs.

2. Wasps and bees generally tend to bite/stung the animal at places where they have less hair, like the nose, mouth, lips and the chest area.

3. Symptoms to look out for: The animal becomes restless, starts vomiting/shows symptoms of diarrhoea, inflammation or swelling of eye lids, nose, lips, muzzle area. The other symptoms of insect bites on dogs like wheezing, weakness, unconsciousness, weak and thready pulse, increased heart rate and fever may cause the animal to go into shock. Other symptoms of insect bites on dogs might lead to cold extremities, trembling, wheezing and collapse.

4. Do not ignore an insect bite, it could be serious and cause a series of allergic reactions in the dog which may even be fatal!

5. Take the dog to the vet immediately while administering first aid on the way to the clinic.

One useful backgrounder article on the subject of ‘Insect Bites on Dogs’ may be accessed here .

For any further queries, mail us at contact@jaagruti.org

Posted in Animals, Articles/Posts in Hindi, Be the Change, Do you know?, Do-it-Yourself (DIY) Series, Do-it-Yourself (DIY)Series: Animal Rescue and Treatment, Information that empowers!, Medical treatment of Animals, Street Dogs of India, Take Action!

First Aid tips for taking care of the dog on your street

Hands that help are better than lips that Pray!  (Image Courtesy: Helping Hands-http://www.fsgp.org/storage/HH_Image.jpg)

Volunteer to provide quick medical relief to the dog who guards your street

A horrifying number of dogs and cats die because of lack of medical attention.  This is all the more tragic because wounds and injuries are surprisingly simple to treat, once you’ve learnt how. Especially for very serious cases, the dog does not even need to be hospitalized.  With your help, street dogs can live a happy and healthy life.  Some of the most common problems that street dogs suffer from are skin infections, wounds and maggot wounds.  All these can be treated easily on site, unless of course the symptoms or the injury are very  severe when the dog needs to be taken to a vet or a shelter.

* Please note: This page will be regularly updated in both Hindi and English language for the benefit of those who care for their community dogs. However, it is to be noted that the information written in there is for informative purposes only. We request you to please do contact a veterinary doctor or take the animal to a shelter for thorough treatment if symptoms look grave.

For further queries or guidance, please write to us at contact@jaagruti.org or call on our helpline +91-9818 144 244

First Aid Kit:

Scissors, forceps, thermometer, chain to restrain the dog, tape to muzzle the dog (or buy a regular muzzle from a vet), adhesive tape, Gauze Bandages, cotton wool, bandages.

Medicines: Betadine Lotion and Ointment, Neosporin or Nebasulf  powder, Himax Ointment (a miracle medicine for animals) or Skinoment, Betnovate Skin Cream, Soframycin skin ointment, Ivermectin – 10 ml vial, Topicure spray, Scabnil Oleo, Neem oil, antibiotic such as Cifran 500 mg (for 20 kg dog), Avil tablets (25 mg or 50 mg -depending on the age and weight of the dog), Petmosol soap, Ecktodex or Ridd, Ivermectin tablets, sulphur powder, camphor powder, boric powder, coconut oil, kerosene oil, Cetrimide Lotion (Anti-allergic wash from Piramal Healthcare)

SKIN DISEASES This is the most common problem that dogs suffer from.  In the first instance, try and avoid them getting skin infections by taking precautions.  Give a pinch of sulphur in the dog’s food once a week.  You can also give a neem tablet (from Himalaya Drug Co.) once a week which is most effective too.  If we can help treat their skin infections, it would eliminate a great deal of suffering the dog undergoes. The most common diseases are mange and scabies and fungal infection. Most dogs can be treated at site. There are various treatments:

Treatment 1 (allopathic treatment)

  • If possible, give the dog a bath with Petmosol soap.  (Repeat once a week till the dog heals).
  • Apply Ektodex 1 tsp in 1 litre solution (or as instructed on the bottle). Note: As this medication is poisonous, do not let the dog lick himself.  Try and walk the dog till the medicine dries.
  • Antibiotics have to be prescribed as the constant scratching will have caused bacterial infections.  Amoxycillin can be given 2 times a day for three days along with Vitamin B capsules.  Avil can also be given to relieve the itching.

Treatment 2Do not apply this mixture on cats.

  • Mix Scabnil Oleo with an equal part of Neem oil.
  • Apply on the dog with a brush.  Repeat every 4 days.
  • The main ingredient of Scabnil Oleo is karanj oil which is a powerful anti-fungal agent.  Neem oil is also strongly anti-fungal.

Treatment 3(Home remedy)Warm Coconut oil and mix 10 cubes of camphor (camphor packet available in the market) and 1 tsp sulphur powder in it.  Then put in 1 tsp Boric powder in it and then kerosene oil and cool the mixture.  Apply the mixture on the dog’s skin, so that it reaches the hair roots. (You can clip the hair if you cannot reach the roots.   You can keep this mixture in a small glass bottle and repeat it until the dog is healed.

 

Some general points for skin diseases.Treatment 2 is very effective for parasitic skin disease like mange or scabies.  In general we have found Treatment 3 to be very effective in heat-related skin problems. This is because of the cooling properties of camphor. At the time of application this treatment may irritate the skin and make the dog restless, but this will pass off in an hour or two. Usually dogs do not try to lick these ointments because of the strong smell. However, to be on the safe side it might be a good idea to keep the dog muzzled during application.

 

WOUNDS (Prevention of maggot wounds)

You may be lucky enough to spot a wound before a housefly does. Do not neglect even a small wound especially if the dog cannot reach it to lick it since they are the ones which very quickly become maggot infested.  A gaping wound, however, is going to require stitches and the dog would be required to be taken to the vet.  If it doesn’t, then you can treat it yourself.

Medicine: Betadine lotion, Neosporin powder, Himax ointment.

Treatment:

1. Clean the wound with Betadine lotion.

2. Sprinkle Neosporin (or Nebasulf) powder liberally into the wound.

3. Put Himax on the wound liberally to keep away flies so that it doesn’t become a maggot wound. If the dog has a caretaker, try leaving Himax with him and tell him to apply it on the wound everyday until it heals.

MAGGOT WOUNDS. An open, round and deep wound with bleeding and which also gives out a foul smell are usually clear indication of a maggot wound (see image).  Since it is a painful procedure, the dog must be muzzled when it is being treated.  Do not treat head wounds but take the dog to a vet or a shelter.

An exhaustive article on treating Maggot wounds can be read here https://jaagruti.org/2013/08/06/treating-dogs-with-maggot-infestations/

Medicine: Ivermectin 10ml vial, Topicure Spray, Betadine lotion, Nebasulf/Neosporin Powder, Lorexane ointment, Himax

Treatment:

  • Put in Ivermectin (about 4-5 drops) in the wound.
  • You can also spray Topicure deep into the wound so that it irritates the maggots to emerge out. If maggots start to emerge, remove them with tweezers.
  • Then apply Nebasulf or Neosporin powder into the wound to heal and dry it.  Next apply Lorexane cream and fill the wound with this.
  • The final and most important layer is the ayurvedic fly repellant Himax cream. Apply it liberally all over the wound so that flies do not get to the wound again.
  • The next day if you can treat the wound again, you will need to repeat the same steps again.
  • Once the wound is a pink colour, you can just sprinkle Neosporin powder in the wound and apply Himax liberally on top of it until it heals.

How to tie a muzzle to treat a dog?

  • Use a long strip of material or a tape (not adhesive or any sticky tape, please)
  • Place the strip of material on top of the dog’s nose.
  • Loop the material under the dog’s chin and tie it into a knot.
  • Bring the ends of the material back behind the dog’s ears and tie into a bow on top of the head.

Remember: Use the muzzle only for treating a dog for a few minutes as the dog can get overheated.

If you have more time at hand, please watch the videos below (uploaded on You Tube by Voice of Stray Dogs) and listen to Dr. Pavan, Founder of Cessna Lifeline Veterinary Hospital in Bangalore. He explains in this two part series as to how to attend to and intervene effectively on Medical emergencies in Animals

* Please note: This information is for informative purposes. Please do contact a veterinary doctor or take the animal to a shelter for thorough treatment if symptoms look grave. For further queries or guidance, please write to contact@jaagruti.org or call us on +91-9818 144 244

First Aid for Dogs- text translated in Hindi can be read below

कुत्तों के लिए प्राथमिक चिकित्सा

सड़क पर रहने वाले कुत्ते और बिल्लियाँ अक्सर उपचार के आभाव में मारे जाते हैंयह बात बहुत  दुखद: हैक्योंकि उनकी मृत्यु का कारण रहे घाव व चोटें आश्चर्यचकित रूप से बहुत आसानी से ठीक किये जा सकते हैं, एकबार आप ने सीख लिया की यह उपचार कैसे किया जाए विशेषतः कुछ गंभीर स्थितियों मेंजब कुत्ते को अस्पताल में रखने की जरुरत नही होतीआप सडकों पर रहने वाले कुत्तों की सु:खद व स्वस्थ जीवन जीने में सहायता कर सकते हैं|

 

त्वचा सम्बन्धी संक्रमणघाव व कृम घाव वे सामान्य समस्याओं में से कुछ हैं जिनसे सड़क पर रहने वाले कुत्ते  सबसे अधिक पीड़ित होते हैंइन सभी समस्याओं  का आसानी से यथा स्थान उपचार किया जा सकता है (यद्यपि ये इतने गंभीर न हों की कुत्ते को पशुचिकित्सक या आश्रय स्थल में ले जाने की जरुरत हो )

प्राथमिक चिकित्सा किट (विषय-वस्तु):

एक बार आपके पास प्राथमिक चिकित्सा किट का सारा सामान हो तो आप किसी भी जरूरतमंद कुत्ते को समय पर चिकित्सा उपलब्ध कराने के लिए तैयार हैं नीचे दी गई औषधियाँ साधारण रूप से कुत्तों के लिए हैंऔर संग्रह करके भविष्य में उपयोग के लिए रखी जा सकती हैं यह सभी औषधियाँ किसी भी पशु-औषधि विक्रेता के पास उपलब्ध होती हैं |

 

कैंचीचिमटाथर्मामीटरकुत्ते को बंधने के लिए चेनकुत्ते का मुहं बंधने के लिए फीता (और पशु चिकित्सक के पास उपलब्ध नियमित मज़ल टेप खरीदें)चिपकने वाला टेपगाज़पट्टी रुई व टॉर्च. दवाइयाँ:: Betadine Lotion, Nebasulf or Neosporin powder, Himax Ointment (पशुओं के लिए एक चमत्कारी औषधि), turpentine oil and chloroform mixture), Topicure spray, Scabnil Oleo, neem oil, antibiotic such as Cifran 500 mg (for 20 kg dog), Avil tablets, Petmosol soap, Ecktodex or Ridd, sulphur powder, camphor powder.

 

घाव (बचाव कृम/मगट घावों से) आप भाग्यशाली होंगे यदि आप घाव को घरेलु मक्खी से पहले देख लेंछोटे से घाव को अनदेखा न करें यही घाव जल्दी कष्टदायक

इसके लिए आवश्यकता हैBetadine lotion, Neosporin powder, Himax ointment.

1. घाव को Betadine lotion से साफ करें 2Nebsulf  Powder या Neosporin Powder को उदारता से घाव पर छिड़कें    3. Himax घाव पर लगाएं यह मक्खियों को दूर रखेगा और घाव को कीड़ों वाला घाव नही बनने देगा| यदि कुत्ते की देखभाल करने के लिए कोई हो तो कोशिश करें की Himax Powder उसके पास रहेउसे घाव पर लगाने के लिए कहें जब तक घाव ठीक न हो जाए|

 

उपचार के लिए कुत्ते का मुहँ कैसे बांधें

  • कपड़े व किसी पदार्थ की लम्बी पट्टी, नाड़ा व टेप (ध्यान रहे यह चिपकने वाला टेप न   हो )  का प्रयोग करें
  • पट्टी को कुत्ते की नाक के ऊपर रखें |
  • पट्टी को कुत्ते की ठोडी के नीचे ले जायें व गांठ बाँध दें
  • पट्टी के दोनों सिरों कुत्ते के कानों के पीछे ले जायें कुत्ते के सिर पर एक बो बाँध दें |

कुत्ते का मुँह केवल उपचार के लिए कुछ मिनटों के लिए बांधें क्योंकि इससे कुत्ते के शारीरिक तापमान में वृद्धि हो सकती है, जो उसके लिए हानिकारक है |

 

त्वचा सम्बन्धी संक्रमण

यह सबसे साधारण समस्या है जो कुत्तों में पाई जाती है | सर्वप्रथम कोशिश करें की संक्रमण बचाव के द्वारा टाला जा सके | चुटकी भर सल्फर कुत्ते के खाने में हफ्ते में एक बार मिलाएँ, आप नीम की गोली (आयुर्वेदिक) दे सकते हैं जो बहुत ही प्रभावकारी है,  यदि हम इनके त्वचा संक्रमण का उपचार  कर सकें तो यह उस कष्ट को बहुत हद तक कम कर सकता है जिसे कुत्ता इस संक्रमण के समय सहन करता है Mange  Scabies  Fungal Infection कुत्तों में सबसे अधिक होने वाली त्वचा की बीमारियाँ हैं|अधिकतर कुत्तों का यथास्थान पर ही उपचार किया जा सकता हैइनके विभिन उपचार हैं |

 

उपचार 1 (एलोपेथिक उपचार)

1. अगर सम्भव है तो कुत्ते को Petmosol साबुन से नहलायें (इसे हफ्ते में एक बार दोहराएँ जब तक कुत्ता ठीक न हो जाए) 2. Ektodex 1 लीटर पानी में चम्मच (या बोतल पर जैसा निर्देशित है ) घोल कर कुत्ते के शरीर पर लगाएं |नोट: यह दवाइयाँ जहरीली हो सकतीं हैंकुत्ता इसे चाट न पाए कुत्ते को जब तक चलायें जब सूख न जाए |3. Anti-biotic दवाइयाँ भी दी जानी चाहियेंक्योंकि कुत्ते द्वारा लगातार खुजाने से बैक्टिरिअल इन्फेक्शन हो सकता है |.  Amoxycillin दिन में बार दी Vitamin B कैप्सूल के साथ दी जा सकती है |  Avil भी दे सकतें हैं |

उपचार 2. इस मिश्रण को बिल्लियों पर न लगाएं | Scabnil oleo को बराबर मात्रा में नीम तेल के साथ मिलाएंकुत्ते पर ब्रुश की सहायता से लगाएंहर दिन में इसे दोहराएँ |  Scabnil oleo में मुख्य सामग्री Karanj oil हैजो एक शक्तिशाली एंटी-फंगल एजेंट है |नीम का तेल भी लाभदायक एंटी-फंगल है |

उपचार 3.  Sulphur Powder व कपूर बराबर मात्रा में अच्छी तरह मिलाएं इसमें नारियल का तेल डालें और मिलाएंध्यान रहे इसमें गाँठें न पड़ेंएवं मिश्रण तरल गाड़ा बनेयदि यह अधिक गाड़ा व गांठवाला होगा तो कुत्ते के शरीर से गिर जाएगा और अधिक तरल होगा तो यह कुत्ते के शरीर पर फ़ैल कर नही लग पायेगा| मिश्रण को कुत्ते पर सिर से पीठ की विपरीत दिशा में लगाएं ताकि यह बालों की जड़ तक पहुँच सके, इसे न रगड़े केवल पर्याप्त परत ही लगाएं |  हर 4 दिन में इस प्रक्रिया को दोहराएँ जब तक कुत्ता ठीक न हो जाए |

  • उपचार २ पैरासिटिक त्वचा सम्बन्धी बीमारी जैसे Mange व Scabies में बहुत प्रभावशाली है सामान्य अवस्थाओं में हमने पाया है की उपचार नम्बर 3 गर्मी से संबंधित त्वचा की बीमारियों में प्रभावकारी है क्योंकि इसमे कपूर होने के कारण शरीर में ठंडक पहुचाने के गुण हैं, इसे लगाते समय
  • कुत्ते कभी-कभी कुछ असुविधा महसूस कर सकतें हैं, परन्तु यह एक से दो घंटे में सामान्य हो जाता  है |अधिकतर कुत्ते इसकी तेज गंध के कारण इसे चाटते नही परन्तु फिर भी लगाते समय कुत्ते का मुहँ बांधना ही उचित है |
  • यदि त्वचा में से पस निकल रही हो तथा बाल झड़ना व खुजली के अलावा कोई और लक्षण हों तो कृपया किसी पेशेवर की सहायता लें, अधिक गंभीर समस्याओं में वर्णित उपचार काफी नही होंगें, यद्यपि अधिकतर स्थितियों में यह उपचार कारगर होतें हैं, यदि इनमें से एक मरहम काम न करे तो दो या तीन सप्ताह बाद दूसरा आजमाएँ |

त्वचा रोगों पर कुछ सामान्य बातें

पेट्स व कम्युनिटी पेट्स का एंटी-रेबीज व डिस्टेम्पर के टीकों से वार्षिक टीकाकरण इन खतरनाक बीमारियों को दूर रखने के लिए किया जाना चाहिए |

  • पिस्सू व चीच्चड़ – Notix Powder का उपयोग करें |
  • अपने पेट्स की हर 4 माह में डी-वोर्मिंग करें, इसके लिए Praziplus या Drontol Plus की एक गोली 15 kg  के भार के कुत्ते को दे |
  • कुत्ते को गोली कैसे दें- इसके लिए सबसे सरल तरीका गोली को बर्फी,  गुलाब जामुन या पनीर के बीच में रख कर दें | वे दवाई को इनके साथ ही निगल जायेंगे
  • सामान्य शारीरिक तापमान – 101.5F |
  • अतिसार–20 kg के कुत्ते के लिए 2 Dependol की गोलियां |सूजन (उदहारण के लिए पैर में व कुत्ता लंगड़ा रहा है ) यदि हड्डी टूटी है तो, कृपया कुत्ते को पशु चिकित्सक के पास ले जाएँ, यदि यह सिर्फ़ सूजन है तो Voveron की एक गोली दिन में दो बार जब तक दें जब तक की सूजन खत्म न हो जाए |

कृपया खुराक की मात्रा कुत्ते के आकार अनुसार तय करें |

*अस्वीकरण: यह सूचना मात्र जानकारी हेतु है,  संदेह की स्थिति में कृपया अपने पशु चिकित्सक से सम्पर्क करें.

For further queries or guidance, please write to us at contact@jaagruti.org or call on our helpline +91-9818 144 244

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